Thursday, June 25, 2009

Versova



versova


In the 16th century

ersova

See also the document on the Northern Suburbs.


In the 16th century Versova was a Portuguese port. Although small and narrow, the harbour was deemed attractive because of the depth, which allowed even very heavily loaded ships access to the docks.

In 1694 Arabs raiders from Muscat sacked the port and massacred all the inhabitants. The island remained in Portuguese possession till 1739, when the Marathas took control of it. Five years later, during the First Maratha War, the British won the island. Although they were forced to return all their mainland conquests through the Treaty of Salbai (1782), the British retained Versova. The island became a training ground for military cadets.

Further development took place only in the 1930's, when, along with Bandra and Juhu, Versova was declared a suburban district. Bungalows set in large open spaces were allowed to be built. The Seven Bungalows area of Versova takes its name from these long-vanished dwellings. was a Portuguese port. Although small and narrow, the harbour was deemed attractive because of the depth, which allowed even very heavily loaded ships access to the docks.

In 1694 Arabs raiders from Muscat sacked the port and massacred all the inhabitants. The island remained in Portuguese possession till 1739, when the Marathas took control of it. Five years later, during the First Maratha War, the British won the island. Although they were forced to return all their mainland conquests through the Treaty of Salbai (1782), the British retained Versova. The island became a training ground for military cadets.

Further development took place only in the 1930's, when, along with Bandra and Juhu, Versova was declared a suburban district. Bungalows set in large open spaces were allowed to be built. The Seven Bungalows area of Versova takes its name from these long-vanished dwellings.

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