Friday, February 25, 2011

VINTAGE BOMBAY-SCHOOLS,COLLEGES,HOSPITALS ;19 th &EARLY 20 TH CENTURY

Sir Cowasjee Jehangir Building, Elphinstone College, Bombay.

Sir Cowasjee Jehangir Building, Elphinstone College, Bombay.




Sir Dinshaw Manackjee Petit Hospital, [Bombay].

 

Bai Motlibai Hospital, [Bombay].

Bai Motlibai Hospital, [Bombay].

'Bombay Native Hospital ... constructed at the joint expense of Sir Jamsetee Jeejeebhoy & the East India Company'. By C. Rosenberg after W. J. Huggins, published Collett and Co., 1843.

'Bombay Native Hospital ... constructed at the joint expense of Sir Jamsetee Jeejeebhoy & the East India Company'.  By C. Rosenberg after W. J. Huggins, published Collett and Co., 1843.

Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy's Hospital, Bombay, 'Side and front Elevations'. Published c.1842

Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy's Hospital, Bombay, 'Side and front Elevations'. Published c.1842. 228

 

The Grant Medical College, with part of Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy's Hospital, Bombay.'--Artist: Sargent, G.R. (fl. c.1844) Medium: Engraving Date: 1844

'The Grant Medical College, with part of Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy's Hospital, Bombay.'
Engraving of the Grant Medical College showing part of Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy's Hospital in Bombay by G. R. Sargent from his own drawing and published by him in London in 1844. The engraving was printed by M & N Hanhart. The Grant Medical College and the Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy Hospital were built in the 1840s and funded jointly by Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy and the East India Company. Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy (1783-1859) was a Parsi merchant and eminent philanthropist. The Grant Medical College is shown in the foreground of this view. It was named after Sir Robert Grant, the Governor of Bombay between 1835 and 1838.

 

Class with teacher in vernacular school, Bombay

Class with teacher in vernacular school, Bombay


Group of mistress and pupils of the Government Normal School, Bombay19TH CENTURY

Group of mistress and pupils of the Government Normal School, Bombay


Group of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay 4639

Group of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay 4639

Group of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1873

Group of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay 4637

A Parsi girls school, Bombay," in an albumen photo by Taurines, c.1880's



*"Parsee children, Bombay," from 'India and its Native Princes' by Louis Rousselet, 1878*


Mumbai’s The Cathedral & John Connon School.


ANTIQUE POST CARD-SCHOOL BOYS AND TEACHER-BOMBAY.THE SCHOOL BOYS ARE USING PALM LEAF BOOKS -IN THEIR HANDS,VEDA



Class with mistress in a mofussil or up-country girls' school, Bombay

Class with mistress in a mofussil or up-country girls' school, Bombay

Group of Parsee pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay --

Group of Parsee pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay





























Group of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1873

Group of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay 4636

Photograph of pupils of the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image was probably exhibited at the Vienna Universal Exhibition of the same year. Female education in india grew dramatically in the latter part of the nineteenth century. The Imperial Gazetteer of India states regarding female education, "The Government did not take up the subject until 1849, when Lord Dalhousie informed the Bengal Council of Education that henceforth its functions were to embrace female education, and the first girls' school recognized by Government was founded shortly afterwards by a committee of native gentlemen. The despatch of of 1854 directed that female education should receive the frank and cordial support of Government...The Education Commission of 1882 advised that female education should receive special encouragement and special liberality...The adoption of this attitude has resulted in a considerable development of the public instruction of girls, although it still lags far behind that of their brothers. In 1871 there were 134 secondary and 1,760 primary girls' schools; in 1901-2 the numbers were 461 and 5,628 respectively."

Group of Maratha pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1873

Photograph of pupils in a class of the Elphinstone High School at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image of pupils gathered around a table conducting an experiment, possibly in physics, was shown at the Vienna Exhibition of the same year. The school shown here is named after Mountstuart Elphinstone who helped to establish the educational structure of the Bombay area. The Imperial Gazetteer of India states, "There are three classes of secondary schools - the vernacular and English middle schools, and the high schools...The English secondary school stage is divided into middle and high school sections, which really form portions of the same course...the English school education should ordinarily be completed by the time the pupil attained the age of sixteen...In English secondary schools the main course has hitherto led up to the matriculation or entrance examination of one or other of the Universities. There are other courses of a more practical character leading up to different examinations...A purely literary education has been more popular among both parents and students, as being in itself more attractive to them and as affording a better opening for remunerative employment. The matriculation has generally been accepted as a qualifying test by Government and private employers as well as by the Universities, and has been regarded as the common goal of the school career."


Group of Maratha(?) pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay


Group of pupils of the Juggunath Shankarset Girls' School, Bombay

Photograph of a group of pupils from the Juggunath Shankarset Girls' School at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image of pupils posed on the verandah was probably shown at the Vienna Exhibition of that year. On the photograph, there is a letterpress caption, above the main caption, which reads "Student's Literary & Scientific Society, founded 1848. President Dr Bhau Daji." S.M. Edwardes wrote in The Gazetteer of Bombay City and Island (3 vols, Bombay (1909-10), "...The Students' Literary and Scientific Society, which supported nine vernacular free schools for girls, attended by 654 pupils, of whom 136 were Marathi-speaking Hindus, 120 Gujarati Hindus and 398 Parsis...The formation of this society was promoted by Professor Patton of the Elphinstone College in 1848. It was intended by the student and assistant teachers of the Elphinstone Institution to be a mutual improvement society and to aid the dissemination of knowledge by means of vernacular lectures and the publication of cheap periodicals in the vernacular languages..."

A girls' school operating in Jagannath Shankar Seth's residential complex



Jagannath Shankar Shet (10 October 1800 – 31 July 1865), was a notable Indian Philanthropist and a revolutionary Educationalist. He was born in 1800 in the wealthy Murkute family of Goldsmiths of the Daivadnya Caste in Mumbai (Bombay). He was one of the founders of Elphinstone College, and Indian Railway Association that became part of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway. He was the first Indian member to be nominated to the Legislative Council of Bombay under the XXTY 26 Act of 1861, a member of the Bombay Board of Education, and also the first Indian member of the famous Asiatic Society of Bombay.

[View] Over university and Secretariat (sq. tower), S. from Rajabai Tower, Bombay, India- Photographer: Ricalton, James Medium: Photographic print Date: 1903

[View] Over university and Secretariat (sq. tower), S. from Rajabai Tower, Bombay, India

























Group of pupils of the Bhagwandas Purshottum Girls' School, Bombay--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1873

Group of pupils of the Bhagwandas Purshottum Girls' School, Bombay

Photograph of a group of pupils from the Bhagwandas Purshottum Girls' School at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image of pupils posed on the verandah was probably shown at the Vienna Exhibition of that year. On the photograph, there is a letterpress caption, above the main caption, which reads "Student's Literary & Scientific Society, founded 1848. President Dr Bhau Daji." S.M. Edwardes wrote in The Gazetteer of Bombay City and Island (3 vols, Bombay (1909-10), "...The Students' Literary and Scientific Society, which supported nine vernacular free schools for girls, attended by 654 pupils, of whom 136 were Marathi-speaking Hindus, 120 Gujarati Hindus and 398 Parsis...The formation of this society was promoted by Professor Patton of the Elphinstone College in 1848. It was intended by the student and assistant teachers of the Elphinstone Institution to be a mutual improvement society and to aid the dissemination of knowledge by means of vernacular lectures and the publication of cheap periodicals in the vernacular languages..."


The Opthalmic Hospital, Bombay.--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1870

Photograph of General view of the rather church-like building, constructed in rubble masonry with a corrugated-iron roof, photographed in the 1870s by an unknown photographer. Sir Cowasji Jehangir Opthalmic Hospital was opened for patients on 21 July 1866. It originally accommodated 28 male and 12 female patients. Later a new building was constructed which contained an outpatient department, a major operating room, a nurses room, surgeon’s office, full accommodation for 30 patients and facilities for the instruction of students from Grant Medical College. The bulk of the operations performed here were cataract operations.


The Opthalmic Hospital, Bombay.

Class in the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1873

Photograph of a class in the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c.1873. This image, showing a class of pupils seated in a semi-circle around a globe was exhibited at the Vienna Exhibition of 1873, and is mentioned on page 224 of John Forbes Watson's catalogue of the Indian Department. Female education in India grew dramatically in the latter part of the nineteenth century. The Imperial Gazetteer of India states regarding female education, "The Government did not take up the subject until 1849, when Lord Dalhousie informed the Bengal Council of Education that henceforth its functions were to embrace female education, and the first girls' school recognized by Government was founded shortly afterwards by a committee of native gentlemen. The despatch of of 1854 directed that female education should receive the frank and cordial support of Government...The Education Commission of 1882 advised that female education should receive special encouragement and special liberality...The adoption of this attitude has resulted in a considerable development of the public instruction of girls, although it still lags far behind that of their brothers. In 1871 there were 134 secondary and 1,760 primary girls' schools; in 1901-2 the numbers were 461 and 5,628 respectively."


Class in the Alexandra Native Girls' Institution, Bombay

Alexandra Native Girls' English Institution, Bombay. 40-Photographer: Narayen, Shivashanker Medium: Photographic print Date: 1890

Photograph of the Alexandra Native Girls' English Institution in Bombay from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by Shivashanker Narayen in the 1890s. According to the Imperial Gazetteer of India there were 134 secondary and 1,760 primary girls' schools in 1871. The Alexander Native Girls English Institution was built by Khan Bahadur Muncherjee Cowasjee Murzban (1839-1917). Murzban was born in Bombay and trained at the Engineering College in Pune. He oversaw the construction of the General Post Office and the Chief Presidency Magistrate's Court in the city. This view reveals the Neo-Gothic architectural style of the building.


Alexandra Native Girls' English Institution, Bombay. 40

Lady Supt's Quarters, St George's Hospital, [Bombay].--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1890

photograph of the Lady Supt's Quarters at St George's Hospital in Bombay from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1890s. St George's Hospital was designed by John Adams (1845-1920) and completed in 1892. Adams joined the Public Works Department in 1869. Working principally in the Neo-Gothic style dominant in Bombay at this time, Adams designed over 25 buildings in the city. His commissions included the Wilson College and the Royal Bombay Yacht Club. In this view of the Lady Supt's Quarters at St George's Hospital we can see that the building has a high pitched roof, an exterior balcony and corner towers. On the lower floor, the balcony is protected by a roof with a timberwork screen above it.


Male Ward, St George's Hospital, [Bombay].--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1890

Photograph of the Male Ward at St George's Hospital in Bombay from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1890s. St George's Hospital was designed by John Adams (1845-1920) and completed in 1892. Adams joined the Public Works Department in 1869. Working principally in the Neo-Gothic style dominant in Bombay at this time, Adams designed over 25 buildings in the city. His commissions included the Wilson College and the Royal Bombay Yacht Club. In this view of the Male Ward at St George's Hospital we can see that the building is punctuated with arcades and has a high pitched roof.
Male Ward, St George's Hospital, [Bombay].

photograph of the Lady Supt's Quarters at St George's Hospital in Bombay from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1890s. St George's Hospital was designed by John Adams (1845-1920) and completed in 1892. Adams joined the Public Works Department in 1869. Working principally in the Neo-Gothic style dominant in Bombay at this time, Adams designed over 25 buildings in the city. His commissions included the Wilson College and the Royal Bombay Yacht Club. In this view of the Lady Supt's Quarters at St George's Hospital we can see that the building has a high pitched roof, an exterior balcony and corner towers. On the lower floor, the balcony is protected by a roof with a timberwork screen above it.





Lady Supt's Quarters, St George's Hospital, [Bombay].
Photograph of the New Cathedral High School in Bombay from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1890s. The New Cathedral High School was built by Khan Bahadur Muncherjee Cowasjee Murzban (1839-1917). Murzban was born in Bombay and trained at the Engineering College in Pune. He oversaw the construction of the General Post Office and the Chief Presidency Magistrate’s Court in the city. This view of the school shows a four-storey structure articulated with arcades, balconies and a high pitched roof.

New Cathedral High School, Bombay.

Anjuman-i-Islam School, [Bombay]--Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1890

Anjuman-i-Islam School, [Bombay].

Photograph of the Anjuman-i-Islam School from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1890s. The school was designed by James Willcocks and overseen by Khan Bahadur Muncherjee Cowasjee Murzban. It was completed in 1893. The structure has a Indo-Saracenic style cupola. This prominant architectural feature can be observed in this exterior view of the building.

Lady Hardings war hospital, Bombay, India, c1918.

Lady Hardings war hospital, Bombay, India, c1918.

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