Thursday, February 3, 2011

TRAVEL BY SHIP BEFORE 1960-- BOMBAY TO LONDON,EUROPE,CALCUTTA,GOA

The Asiatic Steam Company,  employed a large percentage of local Officers that included Indian, Anglo-Indian, Burmese and Anglo-Burmese.an apprentice in 1946 EARNED:-In the first year of his apprenticeship he was paid 15 Rupees per month, the second year 30 Rupees a month, third year 45 Rupees rising to 60 Rupees for the fourth year. The deck crew did not come from the Maldives but from the Laccadives, more specifically Minicoy Island which is about 200 miles west of Cochin, the engineroom crew came from the Nhoakali District of East Bengal (now Bangladesh), carpenters were Chinese and the cabin stewards were from Calcutta. The crew did not eat Curry and potatoes for breakfast but enjoyed a balanced diet including Mutton, vegetables and Rice and like all ships crewed by their ilk ‘live’ supplies were also carried for their consumption such as chickens and sheep which were slaughtered as required because the ships had no refrigerators, running water or air conditioning.MAHARANI.



Asiatic Steam Company,
 Formed in 1878,ships were registered in either London or Liverpool its principle port of operation was Calcutta. Like British India’s eastern service ships once they had departed the United Kingdom they were never to return. The new company enjoyed the patronage of Messrs Thomas H. Ismay and William Imrie of Ismay, Imrie & Company, managers of Oceanic Steam Navigation Company known in the shipping world as the
White Star Line. 
NURJAHAN.



Built: 1884 by Harland & Wolff Ltd, of Belfast.
Tonnage: 2,967 grt, 1,936 nt.
Wrecked near Cape Comorin whilst on passage Bombay to Calcutta on the 21st of November 1890.

The company increased its fleet to five in 1880 when Peshwa the company’s first 2,000 tonner was launched and two years later a further two ships were added to its number on the completion of Nurjahan and Kohinur the company’s first all steel ships.

NADIR


Built: 1889 by Harland & Wolff Ltd, Belfast.
Tonnage: 3,142 grt, 2,041 nt.
Engine: Single screw, Triple expansion by builder.
The company decided to increase its sphere of trading and began operating services to Java and was also successful in tendering a contract with the Government to carry mails to the Andaman Islands, however there was a downside, they 

also became responsible for the transportation of convicts to the penal settlement at Port Blair situated on South Andaman.


PRISON CELLS BELOW DECK


By now Ceylon and Malaya had entered onto the company’s trade routes with principle cargoes being made up of teak, coal, sugar, rice and of course its usual carriage of native deck passengers.


DECK PASSENGERS MIDSHIP
©D. BEEDLE.



DECK PASSENGERS TWEEN DECK. ©D. BEEDLE.


DECK PASSENGERS SLEEPING ARRANGEMENTS.
 


DECK CARGO OF BUFFALO






D LAST BUT NOT LEAST , LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, YOUR PASSENGES AWIT.







Vasna Boatdeck


Vasna Chartroom


Vasna First class lounge


Vasna First Class lounge


Vasna Bridge


Officers Vasna 

PUNDIT

©D. BEEDLE.

Built: 1919 by Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd, Newcastle.
Tonnage: 5,305 grt, 3,199 nt.



BEGUM.


Photo dated November 1951.
©D. BEEDLE.

Built: 1922 by Lithgows, Ltd, Glasgow.
Tonnage: 5,843 grt, 3,656 nt.
NURJEHAN.



Built: 1923 by Charles Connell & Co., Ltd, Glasgow.
RAJPUT


Photograph dated July 1947.
MAHARAJA.





Photograph dated March 1956
 
15th of November 1940, Ranee  fell victim to a mine when in the Suez Canal on the 5th of February 1941.


RANEE SUNK IN SUEZ CANAL;AND
Shahzada lasted a year longer than her sister when she was sunk on the 9th of July 1944 by torpedo 500 miles west of Goa



SUBADUR

Subadur, sank by torpedo and gunfire from unknown submarine on the 7th of April 1942, 170 miles north west of Bombay in the Arabian Sea.BAHADUR



HAVILDAR



Built: 1940 by Lithgows Ltd., Port Glasgow.
Tonnage: 5,407g, 3,1


SHAHJEHAN



Built: 1946 by Lithgows Ltd., Port Glasgow.
Tonnage: 5,460 g, 3,210 n.
 
LOADING COAL AT GARDEN REACH.1947to load 7,000 tons using local labour would take approximately two days, note in these photo’s there are no women or children present, whereas the norm was for them to be working alongside the men, also note the lack of footwear. After tipping the coal into the hold trimmers down below would spread it to the sides of the ship, I think its fair to say that conditions for the trimmers must have been quite appalling. After discharging their baskets the carriers would drop them on deck to be returned by yet more labour and proceed to the bunker station for another load, for their efforts remuneration was about four Rupees a day.









BAHADUR

Built: 1948 by Lithgow’s Ltd, Port Glasgow.
Tonnage: 5,497 grt, 3,244 nt.




Prior to building of National Highway 17 ( NH-17 ) in 1960's and 1970s, Ships and steamers running between Mumbai( Bombay ) and Mangalore calling at different ports were only means of transport along the west coast of India adjoining the Arabian sea as there was no direct railway connection from Mumbai to Goa or Mangalore and kerala .Those who had to travel to GOA had to change train in Miraj from Bombay,while those travelling to Mangalore had to change in palakkad (kerala) and there was no direct train even to cochi or Trivandrum(Thiruanandapuram)
Goa at that time. The popular route was by ship.. These ship services was abandoned later. THE TRAVEL TIME WAS ABOUT 24 HOURS
During the 1970s, coastal communication increased between Bombay and Goa, after introduction of ships by the London based trade firm Shepherd.
Passenger services were started with subsidiary companies, for the Burma trade and the Haj trade to Saudi Arabia.
British India Steam Navigation Company
Registered in 1856 as the Calcutta & Burmah Steam Navigation Co. and in 1862 became British India Steam Navigation Co. Ltd.Many of these ships carried only a few passengers, and some carried native passengers on deck. Fares, c1892, were £47 10s. to £52 10s. depending on accomodation.
Routes:
  • Bombay - coastal ports - Karachi.
  • Bombay - Persian Gulf.
  • Bombay - Seychelles - East Africa - South Africa
  • London - Karachi - Bombay - Persian Gulf.
  • Rangoon - Indian coastal ports - Madras / Bombay / Colombo.





1 comment:

Sunshine said...

Who is the owner of this blog? I would like permission to use some of the photographs