Thursday, November 29, 2018

arrested for running over dog -daily deaths railway track3,014

PETA complaint prompts youth being arrested for running over dog with car in Mumbai

The Asian Age


'3,014 commuters killed on Mumbai railway tracks in 2017' | Cities ...


https://indianexpress.com › Cities › Mumbai

Jan 26, 2018 - According to data provided by the Government Railway Police (GRP) in response to the query, as many as 3,014 commuters died on the tracks on the western, central and harbour suburban services in the metropolis. ... Although suburban railway is considered the lifeline of Mumbai, it is ...

Mumbai accounts for highest railway deaths in country - Mumbai Mirror


Jun 3, 2018 - On an average, nine deaths are reported on the city's railway lines, six of which are owing to trespassing. Seventy-six deaths are reported daily ...

Aug 2, 2018 - Mumbai: Eight people died every day on Mumbai's railway tracks in 2017, down 20% from 10 deaths every day in 2013, data from Government ...

how to stop railway deaths in one day:-politicians please learn
 more police and home guards to prevent railway line walking


Railways announces 20,000 additional jobs, now has 110,000 vacancies to fill

Officials said more than two crore individuals have applied for different posts in railways in response to the jobs announcement earlier this year.

india Updated: Mar 29, 2018 21:27 IST
Press Trust of India
Press Trust of India
Press Trust of India, New Delhi
Railway Job,Railways,Indian Railway
Officials said online tests will be held for jobs in the railway police, locomotive drivers and technicians.(AFP File Photo)
The railways will recruit 20,000 more people, in addition to filling up 90,000 vacancies announced earlier, Railway Minister Piyush Goyal said on Thursday.
The available vacancies have now been increased to 1,10,000 from previously 90,000, he said in a tweet.
“110,000 jobs in Railways for youth: One of the world’s biggest recruitment drive gets even bigger,” Goyal wrote on twitter.
Officials said more than two crore individuals have applied for different posts in railways in response to the jobs announcement earlier this year.
The minister said there was a total of 9,000 job vacancies in the Railway Police Force (RPF) and Railway Protection Special Force (RPSF) and more than 10,000 other additional jobs up for grabs.
Officials said online tests will be held for jobs in the railway police, locomotive drivers and technicians.
The notification and application for Group C (26,502 Assistant Loco Pilot (ALP) and Technician posts) and Group D (62,907 posts) are already out.

 Image result for more police to prevent walking on railway tracks
more 15 and 18 or 20 bogey local trains  to prevent over crowdingImage result for more 15 and 18 or 20 bogey local trains

all platforms to be raised to prevent people sliding under
 Image result for all mumbai railway platforms to be raised to prevent people sliding under











Tuesday, November 27, 2018

After Versova Beach Cleanup, Afroz Shah Eyes Mithi River clean up

After Versova Beach Cleanup, Afroz Shah Eyes Mithi River In Mumbai To Make It Waste-Free


ndtv.com

Community Update


 













After Versova Beach Cleanup, Afroz Shah Eyes Mithi River In Mumbai Image result for Mithi River In MumbaiTo Make It Waste-FreeRelated imageImage result for Mithi River In MumbaiRelated imageImage result for Mithi River In Mumbai

After making Mumbai’s Versova beach clean and litter-free in 160 weeks, environmentalist Afroz Shah has embarked on a new mission to clean city’s longest river Mithi
Maharashtra, News
0
Image result for Mithi River In Mumbai and mahim church 1850
mithi river before humans made it into a sewer


It will take 5 years to clean Mumbai’s longest river, Mithi, says Afroz ShahIt will take 5 years to clean Mumbai’s longest river, Mithi, says Afroz Shah
Mumbai: Three years ago, when a lawyer-turned-environmentalist from Mumbai embarked on a journey to remove tonnes of garbage and provide a litter-free beach to the citizens, little did he know that it would turn into world’s largest beach cleanup drive, with thousands of people contributing towards the cause. Today, the beach warrior Afroz Shah has not only changed the face of Versova beach but has also put India on a global map for showing how citizen-driven movements can curb mounting garbage crisis. As Afroz’s goal has been accomplished after 160 weeks, he has now taken up a new challenge to clean Mumbai’s longest river, Mithi.
Talking to NDTV about his project, Afroz says,
The idea behind Mithi river cleanup is to create an army of people who love and value natural water bodies. I realised how bad the condition of Mithi river is when an Imam of a nearby mosque told me that 30 years ago, he used to use the water from the river as drinking water and now it has turned into a sewage. The river is 18 kilometres long starting at Vihar lake in Powai and ending near the Bandra Kurla Complex. Looking at the condition of the river I can say that it is going to take at least five years to clean the river.
Calling Mithi river as his new-found love, ‘Champions of the Earth’ awardee announced his new mission in a social post on November 14 and said,
“Need to hug nature as we hug our loved ones. Mithi river needs our hug. We intend to hug it tight and long and we start at the mouth of the river.
Along with cleaning the Mithi river in Powai, Afroz will simultaneously work towards curbing plastic pollution from the Dani Paani beach in Malad. Just like Versova beach, volunteers will conduct a weekly cleanup drive on the weekends at both the locations. While two hours (12 PM to 2PM) will be dedicated every Saturday to clean the Dani Paani beach, Mithi river will be cleaned on every Sunday from 10AM to 2PM.
Into the second week of the new mission, Afroz has received an overwhelming response. Around 25 volunteers accompanied him at the Mithi river and seeing them nearly 100 citizens joined and helped in removing plastic and other litter. In both the weeks nearly 4,000 kilos of garbage were cleared and 300 metres of the river has been cleaned so far.
In 2015, Maharashtra Environment Minister Ramdas Kadam had declared that the Mithi river consisted of 93 per cent domestic sewage and 7 per cent industrial waste. The polluted river and the destruction of mangroves were responsible for the July 26, 2005, deluge in Mumbai. The river is clogged with plastic, sewage and garbage. Afroz aims to first clear the solid waste and later the liquid waste from the river.
At the Dani Paani beach, the drive began with cleaning the mangroves.
“Beach Cleanup begins with the cleanup of mangroves. Mangrove plants had fruits of plastic hanging and these fruits are choking them. Humanity messes and we undo,” he tweeted.
By getting rid of plastic items and other wastes from these two water bodies, Afroz aims to achieve four goals – help the marine species by lessening the plastic in their food and habitat, change the mindset of people by making them more responsible towards their surroundings, help community development and get a clean beach.
Cleaning the water body is not enough, changing the mindset of the people is the need of the hour. There are nearly 5-6 million slum dwellers residing close to the river. On every visit, we will sensitise them to maintain cleanliness by telling them to reduce, reuse and recycle garbage, says Afroz.
Netizens came out in full support and thanked Afroz for addressing yet another major issue of Mumbai’s depleting water bodies.
Also Read: Amitabh Bachchan Supports The Man Behind Versova Clean-Up, Gifts Tractor And Excavator For Cleaning The Beach
Actor Randeep Hooda, who has been an active participant in Afroz Shah’s beach cleanup drives, retweeted his post to spread awareness.
Calling it a selfless deed towards the cause of humanity, one tweeple said,
Congratulations for this unselfish service to the humanities. Wondering whether these can be expanded to other cities n states
Another twitter user said, “It’s like watching a surgeon perform bypass surgery on Mumbai’s clogged arteries to prolong its lifespan making Mumbai a much healthier place to reside for us and our GenNext. Wish Dr Afroz and his entire medical team great success for this operation.”
One of the netizens called Afroz pride of India and said, “If this man is not the pride of India then I don’t know who else is. If ever in future our beaches look cleaner and streams carry clean water, then please thank this worthy son of India. May he stay blessed and happy forever.”
Here are a few other tweets boosting the moral of Afroz and his team:
Afroz Shah and his team of volunteers have been instrumental in removing more than 20 million kilos of garbage from Versova Beach over 160 weeks of clean-up. To maintain the cleanliness and ensure that sanitation quotient of the beach doesn’t drop again, the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation has hired a private firm to clean the beach for the next six years. The private firm is expected to spend around 22 crores for the same.
In his 160-week of Versova beach cleanup timeline, Afroz has received several recognitions and the accolades, right from receiving United Nations’ Champions of the Earth award, getting applauded by Prime Minister Narendra Modi for playing a vital role in fulfilling Mahatma Gandhi’s dream of Clean India, to the nature’s way of saying ‘thank you’ with the return of the Olive Ridley turtles to Versova beach after 20 years.
Also Read: After Beating Plastic Pollution, Its Time To End Open Defecation: Versova Beach To Get 52 Public Toilets
NDTV – Dettol Banega Swachh India campaign lends support to the Government of India’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM). Helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan, the campaign aims to spread awareness about hygiene and sanitation, the importance of building toilets and making India open defecation free (ODF) by October 2019, a target set by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, when he launched Swachh Bharat Abhiyan in 2014. Over the years, the campaign has widened its scope to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and menstrual hygiene. The campaign has also focused extensively on marine pollutionclean Ganga Project and rejuvenation of Yamuna, two of India’s major river bodies.

Saturday, November 24, 2018

Again-Earthquake tremors felt in Maharashtra's Palghar

Earthquake tremors felt in Maharashtra's Palghar


Nov 12, 2018 - On January 1 too, an earthquake with its epicentre in Vikramgad ... areas of Palghar district have been experiencing mild tremors since December last year. On December 30 last year, villagers of Valvanda, located 15 km from ...

Jan 2, 2018 - Mumbai, Jan 2 (PTI) A moderate intensity earthquake hit some areas of the neighbouring Palghar district in the early hours today, an IMD ...

:: ASC :: Seismicity of Maharashtra, IndiaSignificant Earthquakes in Maharashtra
The following list briefly outlines known earthquakes in this region which either had observed intensities of
V or higher (historical events) or had known magnitudes of 5.0 or more (instrumented events). General locations are provided for historical events for which "generalized" epicentral co-ordinates are available. Some events which were significant for other reasons are also included. Events of intensity III or greater, in or in the immediate vicinity of Mumbai are also listed. This list will be updated whenever newer information is available. Aftershocks of the 1967 Koyna and 1993 Khilari earthquake will not be listed unless there exists additional data for them. Please note that Magnitude and Intensity are NOT THE SAME. All events are within the state or union territory covered on this page unless stated otherwise.

Acronyms Used:
D=Depth, OT=Origin Time, Mw=Moment Magnitude, Ms=Surface Wave magnitude, Mb=Body Wave Magnitude, ML=Local Magnitude, M?=Magnitude Type unknown


This listing will be modified without notice. Please check back for the latest version when using it elsewhere. Additionally, please reproduce using appropriate CITATIONS/CREDITS.

1524 A.D. - Off the coast of Dabhol, Maharashtra.
A large tsunami (15) caused considerable alarm to the Portuguese fleet who were assembled off the coast of Dabhol (15), Maharashtra.

1594 A.D. - Matheran area, Maharashtra.
19.10 N, 73.20 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity IV (1). This region lies to the east of Mumbai and to the south-east of Kalyan. It is the earliest reported earthquake from this region.
26 May 1618 - Mumbai area, Maharashtra.
18.90 N, 72.90 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity IX (1). This is the most damaging earthquake known to date in or near the Mumbai area. 2,000 fatalities are blamed on this event. The exact location and magnitude of this earthquake are still unclear.
1678 A.D. - Matheran area, Maharashtra.
19.10 N, 73.20 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity VI (1). This region lies to the east of Mumbai and to the south-east of Kalyan.

09 December 1751 - Vangani-Matheran area, Maharashtra.
19.10 N, 73.20 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity VI (1). This region lies to the east of Mumbai and to the south-east of Kalyan.

05 January 1752 - Badlapur-Neral area, Maharashtra.
19.10 N, 73.30 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity V (8). This region lies to the east of Mumbai and to the south-east of Kalyan.

05 February 1752 - Lohagarh-Lonavala area, Maharashtra.
18.70 N, 73.40 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity V (8). This region lies to the west of Pune.

31 October 1757 - Valha-Jejuri area, Maharashtra.
18.20 N, 74.20 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity V (8). This region lies to the south-east of Pune.
1760 - Pune area, Maharashtra.
18.50 N, 73.90 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity IV (8).

17 August 1764 - Mahabaleshwar-Panchgani area, Maharashtra.
17.90 N, 73.70 E
Maximum observed intensity VII (8). Felt in western Maharashtra, at Nashik, Phaltan, Wai, Karad and Hukeri. This region lies to the south-west of Pune.

29 May 1792 - Amli-Revadanda area, Maharashtra.
18.50 N, 73.00 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity V (8). This region lies to the south of Alibag and north of Murud.
23 February 1812 - Pune area, Maharashtra.
18.50 N, 73.90 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity IV (8).
20 March 1826 - Talgaon-Kudal area, Maharashtra.
16.10 N, 73.70 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity VI (8). This region lies to the east of Malvan. This earthquake is also known as the Moze Morwade earthquake.

04 December 1832 - Ajgaon-Terekhol area, Maharashtra.
15.800 N, 73.700 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity VI (8). This earthquake is the largest event known near the state of Goa. No moderate or major earthquakes have been recorded in Goa.

26 December 1849 - Bombay Harbour, Maharashtra.
18.90 N, 72.90 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity IV (8). This region to the east of Colaba, Mumbai.
November 1854 - Bombay Harbour, Maharashtra.
18.90 N, 72.90 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity IV (8). This region to the east of Colaba, Mumbai.
18 December 1854 - Bombay Harbour, Maharashtra.
18.90 N, 72.90 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity IV (8). This region to the east of Colaba, Mumbai.
25 December 1856 - Parsipada-Kasa Khurd area, Maharashtra.
20.00 N, 73.00 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity VII (1). This region lies to the east of Tarapur and to the west of Nashik.
18 November 1863 - Nagalwadi-Julwania area, Madhya Pradesh.
21.80 N, 75.30 E
Maximum observed intensity VI (8). This region lies along the border of Maharashtra in the Khandwa area of Madhya Pradesh.
04 July 1869 - Lasalgaon-Vinchur area, Maharashtra.
20.20 N, 74.20 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity V (1). This region lies to the north-east of Nashik.
12 July 1869 - Dhule area, Maharashtra.
20.90 N, 74.80 E (1)
Maximum observed intensity V (1).
22 November 1872 - Mahadeopur-Sironcha area, Andhra Pradesh.
18.86 N, 80.10 E (9)
Maximum observed intensity VI (9). This area straddles the state border between Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra.

20 July 1935 - Parsipada-Kasa Khurd area, Maharashtra, Ms 5.0 (1).
20.00 N, 73.00 E (1)
This region lies to the east of Tarapur and to the west of Nashik.

16 September 1935
- Vashi area, Maharashtra, M? 3.0 (8).
19.10 N, 73.00 E (8)
Maximum observed intensity III (8).
14 March 1938 - Bhusawal-Sawda area, Maharashtra, Mw 6.3 (11).
21.13 N, 75.83 E, D=040.0 kms, OT=00:48:38 UTC (2)
Maximum observed intensity VII (2). This earthquake was felt over a wide region, including at Agra in the north and Mumbai in the west. Deep-seated event (11), with a focal depth (11) of 40 kilometres.
27 November 1945 - Off the Makran coast, Pakistan, Mw 8.0 (14)
24.500 N, 63.000 E, D=025.0 kms, OT=21:56 UTC (14)
At least 2000 people killed in southern Pakistan and neighbouring Iran. Tsunamis with heights of 12 meters struck the Makran coast. Damage also occurred at Ormara. 15 people were killed by the tsunami in Mumbai.

08 April 1951 - Off the Konkan Coast, M? 6.0 (9)
18.500 N, 70.800 E, OT=20:53:08 UTC (9)
Centred in the Arabian Sea, 218 kilometres east-south-east of Mumbai, this was the largest earthquake in this part of the Arabian Sea in recent history. It was felt at Mumbai, Pune and Surat.

25 August 1957 - Lalburra-Tikari area, Madhya Pradesh, Ms 5.5 (2).
22.000 N, 80.000 E, OT=21:04:50 UTC (2)
The district of Balaghat in Madhya Pradesh and Bhandara in Maharashtra were affected. 25 fatalities are reported for this event. The epicentre of this earthquake was north of the town of Waraseoni in Madhya Pradesh and the town of Gondia in Maharashtra.
13 December 1957 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, M? 5.4 (9).
17.300 N, 73.700 E, OT=03:37:12 UTC (9)
- No Comment -

04 June 1965 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, M? 5.4 (9).
17.000 N, 73.400 E, OT=03:37:12 UTC (9)
- No Comment -

25 April 1967 - Mahad-Goregaon area, Maharashtra, M? 5.6 (9).
18.260 N, 73.300 E, D=051.0 kms, OT=03:53:19 UTC (5)
This event was located on the Konkan coast, to the south-west of Pune.

13 September 1967 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, M? 6.0 (5, 9).
17.600 N, 74.000 E, D=004.0 kms, OT=06:23:32 UTC (5, 9)
Felt strongly in western Maharashtra. Some damage reported (7) in the Koyna region.

13 September 1967 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Ms 5.5 (2).
17.400 N, 73.700 E, D=004.0 kms, OT=06:48:25 UTC (2)
Felt strongly in western Maharashtra. Some damage reported (7) in the Koyna region.

10 December 1967 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mw 6.5 (2).
17.450 N, 73.850 E, D=027.0 kms, OT=06:48:25 UTC (2)
200 people were killed and many villages in the Koynanagar area were severely affected. The Koyna Dam suffered some structural damage and leaks were observed in the face of the dam. Tremors were felt strongly in many towns and cities in western Maharashtra, including, Mumbai and Pune. Also felt in Goa and other parts of western and southern India.

26 September 1970 - Wai area, Maharashtra, M? 5.5 (9).
18.000 N, 74.000 E, OT=16:36:44 UTC (9)
It is located roughly 60 kilometres to the south of Pune.

17 February 1974 - Arabian Sea, M? 5.0 (8).
17.500 N, 73.100 E (8)
This event was located off the Konkan coast, to the west of Guhagar near Ratnagiri.

02 September 1980 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mw 5.0 (13).
17.270 N, 73.760 E, D=033.0 kms, OT=16:39:14 UTC (2)
Strongest in a series of small to moderate earthquakes from this date to the end of September 1980.

20 September 1980 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Ms 5.2 (2).
17.260 N, 73.640 E, D=019.0 kms, OT=10:45:30 UTC (2)
Second largest event in a series of small to moderate earthquakes from this date to the end of September 1980.

14 September 1983 - Bhatsa area, Maharashtra, Mb 4.3 (2).
19.640 N, 73.540 E, D=033.0 kms, OT=21:53:41 UTC (2)
This earthquake is believed to have been induced by the Bhatsa Dam.

14 November 1984 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mb 4.5 (2).
17.280 N, 73.960 E, D=015.0 kms, OT=11:58:20 UTC (2)
Felt strongly in western Maharashtra and as far as Belgaum, Karnataka. 2 injuries were reported (10).

12 August 1991 - Arabian Sea, Ms 4.1 (10).
18.387 E, 71.15 E, D=033.0 kms, OT=16:41:06 UTC (10)
This earthquake was centred in the Arabian Sea, roughly 138 kilometres south-southwest of Colaba, Mumbai.

18 October 1992 - Nilanga-Killari area, Maharashtra, Mb 4.3 (2).
18.100 E, 76.730 E, D=025.0 kms, OT=17:33:02 UTC (2)
Felt strongly in Latur district and many people rushed outdoors in panic. Many buildings were damaged by the tremor, which was the largest event in a swarm that was felt in the area from August to October 1992.

24 August 1993 - Arabian Sea, Mb 4.9 (2).
20.700 E, 71.440 E, D=029.0 kms, OT=17:47:30 UTC (2)
This event was located in the Gulf of Khambat, to the west of Surat, Gujarat. This earthquake was felt widely in south-eastern Gujarat and parts of coastal Maharashtra. In Gujarat, people rushed out into the open at Ankleshwar, Bardoli, Bharuch and Bulsar. It was felt strongly (MM V) at Rajula. It was also felt (MM IV) at Amreli, Bhavnagar and Surat. In Maharashtra, it was felt (MM III) in Mumbai. Reports of tremors were received from Bandra, Chembur, Juhu, Kandivili and Prabhadevi. The shock was perceived over an area with a radius of 250 kilometres.

28 August 1993 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mb 4.8 (2).
17.240 N, 73.730 E, D=005.0 kms, OT=04:26:24 UTC (2)
Felt in western Maharashtra, including at Mumbai and Pune. 10 school students were injured in a stampede that broke out in their school in Ichalkaranji. Slight damage was reported for this tremor.

30 September 1993 - Killari area, Maharashtra, Mw 6.2 (10)
18.090 N, 76.470 E, OT=22:25:50 UTC (2)
Among the deadliest intraplate earthquakes on record. Close to 8,000 people were killed and thousands injured in the pre-dawn earthquake. Many villages in the epicentral area, around Killari were razed to the ground. 55 people were killed in the neighbouring state of Karnataka, in Gulbarga district. Strong tremors were experienced at Hyderabad, Pune and Mumbai and across much of Maharashtra, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Goa. Tremors were felt as far as Chennai.

08 December 1993 - Chandoli area, Maharashtra, Mw 5.1 (13).
17.000 N, 73.650 E, D=032.0 kms, OT=01:42:17 UTC (2)
1 elderly woman died of a heart attack and 6 were injured in this early morning quake. It was felt very strongly all over western Maharashtra and Goa for close to 20 seconds. Moderate damage was reported in several villages in the epicentral area.

01 February 1994 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mb 5.0
17.228 N, 73.523 E, OT=09:30:55 UTC (10)
1 person hospitalised for shock in the Pimpri-Chinchwad area. Tremors were felt for close to 18 seconds in western Maharashta and in Goa and Karnataka.

14 December 1995 - Killari area, Maharashtra, ML 4.6 (4)
18.131 N, 76.543 E, D=010.0 kms, OT=04:09:32 UTC (4)
Felt in widely in the Marathwada area of Maharashtra. 10-12 wall collapses were reported from the Umarga area of Dharashiv (Osmanabad) district. Many houses in Ausa, Ganjankhed, Haregaon, Mangrul, Nandurga, Nimbala, Nilanga, Renapur, Sirsi Police Lines and Talni developed cracks.

31 May 1998 - Koparpada-Naude area, Maharashtra, ML 3.6
19.040 N, 73.110 E, OT=13:29 UTC (4)
This earthquake was the first instrumented event in this general area. Tremors were felt in Thane (MM IV-V) and at Dombivili, Kalyan, Kulgaon and Mumbra. Mild tremors (MM III-IV) were experienced in Mumbai at Borivali, Chembur, Dahisar, Juhu, Malad, Mira Road, Santa Cruz and Wadala as well as in south Mumbai.

12 March 2000 - Koyna are, Maharashtra, Mw 5.0
17.244 N, 73.707 E, D=05.0 kms, OT=18:03:52 UTC
A moderate earthquake struck the Koyna region in Maharashtra, India, on 12 March 2000 at 23:33 PM local time resulting in some damage to property in the Koyna-Warna region of Maharashtra. It had a magnitude of Mw=5.0 and was felt for close to 28-seconds in the states of Maharashtra, Karnataka and Goa.

19 June 2000 - Killari area, Maharashtra, ML 4.6 (4)
18.008 N, 76.532 E, OT=08:22 UTC (4)
Felt in Marathwada, Maharashtra. Also felt at Solapur in Maharashtra and Gulbarga in Karnataka.

05 September 2000 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mw 5.2
17.332 N, 73.790 E, D=010.0 kms, OT=00:32:43 UTC
A moderate earthquake struck the Koyna region in Maharashtra, India, on 5 September 2000 at 06:02 AM local time resulting in some damage to property in the districts of Kolhapur, Pune, Ratnagiri, Satara and Sangli in Maharashtra. It had a magnitude of Mw=5.2 and was felt for close to 47-seconds in the states of Maharashtra, Karnataka and Goa.

16 November 2001 - Airoli area, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, ML 2.9
19.155 N, 73.007 E, OT=20:08:39 UTC
A mild earthquake struck parts of Thane and Mumbai districts, on 16 November 2001 at 01:38 AM local time. It had a magnitude of ML=2.9 and was felt distinctly in parts of both districts.

27 March 2003 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, ML 4.1
17.379 N, 73.803 E, D=015.0 kms, OT=06:18:25 UTC
A light earthquake struck the Koyna-Warna region in Maharashtra, India, on 27 March 2003 at 11:48 AM local time causing minor damage to property in Patan taluka. The earthquake had a magnitude of ML=4.1 and was felt in parts of western Maharashtra. A milder foreshock at 10:36 AM resulted in one death at Sayyedwadi in Ratnagiri district.

27 July 2003 - Sindvani area, Maharashtra, ML 3.8
21.878 N, 74.341 E, D=020.0 kms, OT=04:35:33 UTC
A mild earthquake struck the border areas of the states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat on 27 July 2003 at 10:05 AM local time. It caused some minor damage in the region and had a magnitude of ML=3.8.

17 May 2004 - Katraj-Dive Ghats, Pune, ML 3.2
18.365 N, 73.936 E, D=08.3 kms, OT=22:14:41 UTC
A mild earthquake was felt in the Pune metropolitan area in Maharashtra, on 17 May 2004 at 03:44 AM local time. The earthquake had a magnitude of ML=3.2 and was centred in the Dive-Katraj range between the Dive & Katraj Ghats to the south of the Pune urban area.

14 March 2005 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, ML 5.1
17.139 N, 73.687 E, D=25.0 kms, OT=15:13:45 UTC
A moderate earthquake struck western Maharashtra as well as adjoining areas of Goa and northern Karnataka on the afternoon of 14 March 2005 and lasted nearly 30-seconds. It had a magnitude of ML=5.1. It caused damage in the Chandoli-Koyna-Warna region and resulted in at least 46 minor injuries. Another tremor of Mb=4.3 tremor occurred the following day. 

13 April 2005 - Marathwada, Maharashtra, ML 4.0
18.66 N, 76.60 E, OT=06:07:03 UTC
A light earthquake struck the Marathwada region in Maharashtra, India, on 13 April 2005 at 11:37 AM local time causing minor damage to property in the region.

14 June 2005 - Ambarnath region, Maharashtra, Mw 3.7
19.238 N, 73.201 E, D=2 kms, OT=12:16:12 UTC
A mild earthquake struck the Titvala region near Mumbai, Maharashtra, on 14 June 2005 at 17:46 PM local time. It had a magnitude of Mw=3.7 and was felt in many towns in the region as well as in suburban Mumbai.

30 August 2005 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mb 4.7
17.070 N, 73.770 E, D=10.0 kms, OT=08:53:20 UTC
A light earthquake struck the Koyna-Warna region in Maharashtra, India, on 30 August 2005 at 02:23 AM local time causing minor damage to property in Patan taluka. The earthquake had a magnitude of Mb=4.7 and was felt in parts of western Maharashtra, north Karnataka and Goa.

4 January 2006 - Marathwada region, Maharashtra, ML 3.5
18.222 N, 76.392 E, D=7.1 kms, OT=11:01:33 UTC
A mild earthquake struck the Marathwada region in Maharashtra, India, on 4 January 2006 at 16:31 PM local time. It had a magnitude of ML=3.5 and was felt strongly in some parts of the region.

17 April 2006 - Koyna area, Maharashtra, Mb 4.4
17.003 N, 73.797 E, D=35.0 kms, OT=16:40:02 UTC
A light earthquake struck the Koyna-Warna region in Maharashtra, India, on 17 April 2006 at 22:10 PM local time causing minor damage to property in Patan taluka. The earthquake had a magnitude of Mb=4.4 and was felt at many places in western Maharashtra, north Karnataka and Goa.

31 March 2007 - Nanded region, Maharashtra
An earthquake swarm accompanied by loud explosion-like reports began to be felt in the town of Nanded and the adjoining areas on 31 March 2007 local time. Minor damage and a few injuries were reported as a result of the tremors in Nanded.

6 June 2007 - Katraj-Khadakwasla region, Pune, Maharashtra, M2.6
OT=07:48 UTC
A mild earthquake was felt in the Pune metropolitan area in Maharashtra, on 6 June 2007 at 13:18 PM local time. The earthquake had a magnitude of M?=2.6 and was felt in parts of the Pune metropolitan area. Officials at the Meteorological Department also suggested the possibility that this might have been the result of underground tunneling work that is underway in the apparent epicentral region and not of seismic origin.

21 August 2007 - Warna-Koyna region, Maharashtra, ML 4.0
17.170 N, 73.770 E, D=5.0 kms, OT=19:15:51 UTC
A light earthquake occurred in Koyna-Warna (Chandoli) region of south-western Maharashtra on 21 August 2007 at 00:45 AM local time and caused minor damage in the epicentral region. The earthquake had a magnitude of ML=4.0 and was felt in several parts of the region including as far as the Pune region to the north.

6 September
2007 - Marathwada, Maharashtra, ML 4.1
18.057 N, 76.535 E, D=10.0 kms, OT=07:09:44 UTC
A light earthquake occurred in Marathwada region of south-central Maharashtra on 6 September 2007 at 12:39 PM local time and caused panic as well as minor damage in the epicentral region. The earthquake had a magnitude of ML=4.1 and was felt in parts of south-central Maharashtra and in north Karnataka.

30 July
2008 - Koyna region, Maharashtra Mb=4.3
17.324 N, 73.747 E, D=3.2 kms, OT=19:11:01 UTC
A light earthquake (M4.0-4.9 termed as light) occurred in the Koyna (Koynanagar-Helwak area) region of south-western Maharashtra on 30 July 2008 at 00:41 AM local time. The earthquake centred in the Gokul-Waghini area had a magnitude of Mb=4.3 causing some damage, minor injuries and was felt in several parts of the region including as far as Mumbai & Nashik.


16 September
2008 - Koyna region, Maharashtra Mb=4.9
17.289 N, 73.815 E, D=10 kms, OT=21:47:15 UTC
A light earthquake (M4.0-4.9 termed as light) occurred in the Koyna region of south-western Maharashtra on 17 September 2008 at 03:17 AM local time. The earthquake centred in the Koyna-Warna area had a magnitude of Mb=4.9 and caused widespread damage in the epicentral region and at least one death near Pune. The shock was felt for over 45-seconds in much of western Maharashtra, Goa and north Karnataka, even as far south as Bengaluru.



Maximum observed intensity IV (1). This region lies to the east of Mumbai and to the south-east of Kalyan. It is the earliest reported earthquake from this region.

Related news from geological survey of India on Western Deccan Volcanic region

Lava Channel of Khedrai Dam, Northeast of Nasik in Western Deccan ...




Lava Channel of Khedrai Dam, Northeast of Nasik in Western Deccan Volcanic ... lava tubes and extensive flow field during the 1991993 eruption of Mount Etna.
 It is interesting to note that most of the rock cut caves reported from Maharashtra, in Deccan Volcanic Province are from pāhoehoe flows. ... Lava caves are known to have served as homes and temporary shelters throughout history and are significant archaeological sites.

Lava channel - Wikipedia




A lava channel is a stream of fluid lava contained within marginal zones of static (i.e., solid and stationary) lava or lava levees. The initial channel may not .
 

The genesis of a lava cave in the Deccan ... - Scholar Commons



by NR Pawar - ‎2015 - ‎Related articles
Deccan Volcanic Province; speleology; drained lobe; lava cave. Received 14 June ..... channel of Khedrai Dam, Northeast of Nasik in Western. Deccan volcanic ..

Erosion helps discover lava cave at Somatne | Pune News - Times of ...



Dec 24, 2015 - TNN | Dec 24, 2015, 09:19 IST ... The cave, they say, was formed by draining of a segment of lava tube ... Ghoradeshwar already has Buddhist sculpted caves carved in lava ... paper titled 'The genesis of a lava cave in the Deccan Volcanic', ... Nikhil Pawar, a student of geography department at Nowrosjee

The volcanic geoheritage of the Elephanta Caves, Deccan Traps ...



India cut caves in Deccan basalt on the island of Elephanta, in the Mumbai ... and or the history of science, or can be used for research, teaching, squeeze-ups, ...

Deccan Traps - Wikipedia


Image result for The genesis of a lava cave in the Deccan

Jump to History - History. The Deccan Traps began forming 66.25 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period. The bulk of the volcanic eruption occurred at the Western Ghats some 66 million years ago. This series of eruptions may have lasted less than 30,000 years in total.


Top 10 Earthquake Prone-Areas in India - LinkedIn




Dec 14, 2015 - ... terms of zone factors, which means India is divided into 4 seismic zones: Zone 2. Zone 3. Zone 4. Zone 5. Zone 5 is highly prone to the earthquake with the highest level of ... are observed as high earthquake prone zones: 1. Guwahati - Assam ... It should be noted that for the last 20 years, almost all of the ...
Top 10 Earthquake Prone-Areas in India


4.    Mumbai - Maharashtra
Mumbai falls in the Zone 4 of the seismic zone divisions which makes it quite vulnerable to damage.
We all know Mumbai  is located on the coastal line, which increases the risk of facing tsunami-like disasters. Mild to strong earthquakes are very common in parts of Mumbai. Mild earthquakes are often faced by people living there and parts of the adjoining regions of Gujarat. It should be noted that for the last 20 years, almost all of the buildings in Mumbai have been designed and built keeping in mind that the city falls in seismic zone 4.


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MUMBAI: While areas in the Himalayan belt are more likely to experience major earthquakes as they lie in seismic zone 5, the country's financial capital lies in the moderate seismic zone 3 which can experience quakes up to 6.5 on the Richter scale.Oct 9, 2005

'City falls in moderate seismic zone' | Mumbai News - Times of India


https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mumbai/City-falls...seismic-zone/.../1257119.cm...

'City falls in moderate seismic zone' | Mumbai News - Times of India


https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com › City News › Mumbai News

Oct 9, 2005 - MUMBAI: While areas in the Himalayan belt are more likely to experience major earthquakes as they lie in seismic zone 5, the country's financial capital lies in the moderate seismic zone 3 which can experience quakes up to 6.5 on the Richter scale.




How was the Earth formed? Discovery of massive interior mountains may tell

Scientists have discovered massive mountains in the Earth's mantle
structure-core-Earth-Structure-layers-of-the-earth 3D rendering of the structure of the earth's crust | illustration-Shutterstock
Scientists have discovered massive mountains in the Earth's mantle, an advance that may change our understanding of how the planet was formed.
Most school children learn that the Earth has three layers: a crust, mantle and core, which is subdivided into an inner and outer core.
While that is not wrong, it does leave out several other layers that scientists have identified within the Earth.
In a study published in the journal Science, scientists used data from an enormous earthquake in Bolivia to find mountains and other topography on a layer located 660 kilometers straight down, which separates the upper and lower mantle.
Lacking a formal name for this layer, the researchers simply call it "the 660-km boundary."
To peer deep into the Earth, scientists from the Princeton University in the US and the Institute of Geodesy and geophysicists in China, used the most powerful waves on the planet, which are generated by massive earthquakes.
Data from earthquakes that are magnitude 7.0 or higher send out shockwaves in all directions that can travel through the core to the other side of the planet—and back again.
For this study, the key data came from waves picked up after a magnitude 8.2 earthquake—the second-largest deep earthquake ever recorded—that shook Bolivia in 1994.
Scientists used powerful computers to simulate the complicated behaviour of scattering waves in the deep Earth.
The technology depends on a fundamental property of waves: their ability to bend and bounce.
Just as light waves can bounce (reflect) off a mirror or bend (refract) when passing through a prism, earthquake waves travel straight through homogenous rocks but reflect or refract when they encounter any boundary or roughness.
"We know that almost all objects have surface roughness and therefore scatter light," said Wenbo Wu, who was at Princeton at the time of the study.
"That's why we can see these objects—the scattering waves carry the information about the surface's roughness," said Wu, who is now a postdoctoral researcher at the California Institute of Technology in the US.
"In this study, we investigated scattered seismic waves traveling inside the Earth to constrain the roughness of the Earth's 660-km boundary," Wu said.
The researchers were surprised by just how rough that boundary is—rougher than the surface layer that we all live on.
"In other words, stronger topography than the Rocky Mountains or the Appalachians is present at the 660-km boundary," said Wu.
Their statistical model did not allow for precise height determinations, but there's a chance that these mountains are bigger than anything on the surface of the Earth.
The roughness was not equally distributed, either; just as the crust's surface has smooth ocean floors and massive mountains, the 660-km boundary has rough areas and smooth patches.
The researchers also examined a layer 410 kilometers down, at the top of the mid-mantle "transition zone," and they did not find similar roughness.
"They find that Earth's deep layers are just as complicated as what we observe at the surface," said seismologist Christine Houser, an assistant professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology who was not involved in this research.
The presence of roughness on the 660-km boundary has significant implications for understanding how our planet formed and continues to function.