Thursday, May 8, 2014

Nima Parekh the first gujarati in BRITISH BOMBAY 1677


















































===============================================================================================================











    The Commodity King | Virji Vora (1585-1670 )





  1. Aapnu Bombay as much as Amchi Mumbai - Times Of India

    timesofindia.indiatimes.com › CollectionsGujarati
    Feb 15, 2010 - If Mumbai went on to become the financial capital of the country — a melting pot of ... largely due to efforts by British rulers to get 'outsiders', especially Gujaratis, ... As a first step, an agreement was signed with Nima Parekh, ... The 10-point agreement came to be known as 'Treaty with Nima Parekh in 1677'.
  2. Fw: Gujarati Indians Prosperity before arrival of the British

    https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/karmayog-baroda/.../2845?var=1
    Shri Nima Parekh (1677) - After Mumbai went on to become the financial capital ... As a first step, the British signed an Agreement with Nima Parekh, a business ...
  3. Surti Sahukars - Times of India Publications

    lite.epaper.timesofindia.com/mobile.aspx?...
    And,his business empire was bigger than the English companys.Surats Abdul ... Nima Parekh | AD 1677 ... capital of the country it was largely due to efforts by British rulers to get businessmen from Gujarat to settle down in erstwhile Bombay.As a first step,an agreement was signed with Gujarati businessman Nima Parekh.

    Nima Parekh - Yasni.com

    www.yasni.com/nima+parekh/check+people
    Check Nima Parekh: Gujarat, India, Mumbai, Amchi Mumbai, free people check with all available information ... 15.02.2010 · The 10-point agreement came to be known as 'Treaty with Nima Parekh in 1677'. ... As a first step, an agreement was signed with Nima Parekh, a businessman from Gujarat. ... www.gopetition.co.uk.

    How Bombay became India's financial hub | NRI World

    www.nriworld.in/nri/1012-how-bombay-became-india-s-financial-hub
    Nov 5, 2010 - The history of Bombay, now known as Mumbai, shows that it ... to build a prosperous city, the British first invited Gujarati businessmen by ... An agreement was signed with Nima Parekh a businessman from Gujarat in 1677, ...

    Brits invited Gujaratis to Mumbai for prosperity



    AHMEDABAD: An editorial that appeared in the Shiv Sena mouthpiece, 'Saamna', on May 1 raised doubts about Gujarati settlers' sense of belonging to Mumbai and Maharashtra and accused them of 'exploiting' Mumbai to generate wealth for themselves. If Mumbai today has become the financial capital of the country - a melting pot of cultures - it is largely due to the efforts of the British in persuading businessmen from Surat to settle in erstwhile Bombay.

    The Sena mouthpiece, which has once again tried to raise the bogey of 'exploitation' by Gujaratis, needs to be taken on a walk down memory lane.

    The story goes back to May 1662. King Charles II of England married Catherine of Braganza whose family gave a huge dowry to the groom. A part of this gift was the Portuguese territory of Bombay. However, Charles did not want the trouble of ruling these islands and rented out the whole of Bombay to the East India Company for just £10 in gold a year.

    After the Company got Bombay, it first invited Gujarati businessmen to settle there by offering them incentives along with a guarantee of their safety. The British wanted to ensure a prosperous future for the city. As a first step, an agreement was signed with Nima Parekh, a businessman from Gujarat. The Company promised all members of the caste which chose to move to Bombay that they would be free to follow their religion and would be "secured from all molestation". The 10-point agreement came to be known as the 'Treaty with Nima Parekh in 1677'.

    The book, 'The English in Western India', published in 1856 by Anderson Philip, talks about these pre-conditions. "Not only artisans, but opulent tradesmen were also induced to settle by promise of liberal treatment and religious toleration," the book says. The treaty allowed the settlers to cremate their dead and observe all such ceremonies as were customary. It was emphasised that none would be compelled to embrace Christianity.





    THE DROWNING OF SULTAN BAHADUR OF GUJARAT WATCHED BY THE PORTUGUESE, 1537. ARTIST: UNKNOWN







    THE BRITISH AT SURAT FORT;BEFORE BOMBAY FORT WAS MADE






    Dutch Factory at Surat 1634
    (CAPTURED BY ENGLISH BEFORE SHIFTING TO BOMBAY FORT)


    Gerald Aungier


    Gerald Aungier was the second Governor of Bombay. He was made the president of the Surat factor and the governor of Bombay in 1672, which posts he held till 1675. He was responsible for the initial growth of the city. He died in the year 1677.Although the Portuguese king had ceded all the islands of Bombay to the British king Charles, the Portuguese in India refused to hand over the the territory. It was not till 1675 that Aungier actually took possession of Colaba and Old Man's Island, thus completing the transfer of power to the British. His plan of fortifying the main island, from Dongri in the north to the harbour, had to wait until 1715 for completion, when Charles Boone became the governor of the town.














    photo taken inside Bombay fort ,before fort walls removed 1850's


    Bombay fort walls





    A studio portrait of a Kathiawar Rajput gentleman posed with a hookah, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections. This was taken by Hurrichund Chintamon and shown in the Paris Exhibition of 1867
    Studio portrait of the Nimbalkar of Satara (a Maratha), taken at Mumbai by Hurrichund Chintamon c. 1867, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections. This photograph was exhibited at the Paris Exhibition of 1867. A Maratha was a member of the princely and military class of the former Hindu kingdom of Maharashtra in central India (now the modern state of Maharashtra).
    Portrait of three Parsees and a Parbhu, taken by Hurrichund Chintamon, c. 1867.
    Bhattia merchant (Bombay).

    As Europeans came into contact with other peoples there was an urge to document different races, customs, costumes and occupations..

    Parsees came later to Bombay when second english governor -Gerald Aungier requested 'all from every where in india ' to come and settle in bombay-

    The British Fort, Bombay, Harbour face wall,-GUNS POINTING DOWN INTO

    MOAT 1863.--Date: 1863--Photogrph BOMBAY FORT- GUNS ARSENAL

    picture of six 'Native Judges and Officers of the Court of the Recorder, at Bombay',
    f.21   'The Bazar Gate and Part of the Town of Bombay taken from the Esplanade'.
    BAZAR GATE AREA, BOMBAY FORT SHOWS HARBOUR BUILDINGS-
    A PALANQUIN TAXI,TENTS USED BY SOLDIERS,A WELL WITH WATER WHEEL;MAST OF SHIPS IN HARBOUR,STORAGE GODOWS


      cotton merchants OF Bombay at  BOMBAY GREEN [HORNIMAN CIRCLE] AREA 1850's.
    In the back ground cotton bales being weighed for export

    http://www.prints-4-u.com/store/images/M1010870/M1010870388.jpg
    BOMBAY MERCHANTS (read)




















    share market Bombay 1860's



    Parsi Theatrical Company

    Mumbai Gujarati Natak Mandali







    MERCHANT AND TAXI(PALANQUIN)Bombay 1860's