Tuesday, September 13, 2011

[PART-1B](BOMBAY)MUMBAI LIFE/PHOTOS/ MAPS/ Names - 1600




[PART-1Ahttp://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/09/1a-bombaymumbai-taxi-1850-to-2001-also_3982.html


[PART-1B


[PART-2]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/glimpses-of-old-bombay-and-western.html


[PART-3]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/glimpses-of-old-bombay-and-western_02.html


[PART-4]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/4glimpses-of-old-bombay-and-western.html


[PART-5]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/dedicated-to-first-city-mumbai-bombay.html


[PART-6]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/6.html


[PART-7]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/6-glimpses-of-old-bombay-and-western.html


[PART-8]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/7.html


[PART-9]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/04/first-anglo-maratha-war-was-first-of.html

[PART 10]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/06/bombay-history-of-cinema-1896-and.html

[part11]http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/06/indian-modes-of-irrigation1874-elephant.html





The flag of Indian Empire from 1879 to 1946. This flag fluttered atop Fort William in Calcutta and many other public buildings but was seen as a symbol of oppression by nationalists who were to eventually lead India to freedom from European rule.

[continuation from 1A]

Sir Pherozeshah Mehta
fathered
Bombay's municipal charter by writing
the Municipal Act of 1872, helped
found the Central Bank and
established the independent
newspaper, the Bombay Chronicle.

Dadabhai Nawroji

was the first Asian member
of the British Parliament. He lobbied for the
political rights and representation in the British
Administrative services in India. He was the
founder of the Indian National Congress.

Jamsetji Tata

was the founder of the Tata
Industries. He was the pioneer of Iron and Steel
industry in India. He also built the famous Taj
Mahal Hotel.

Sir Dinshaw M. PetitSee more
Image result for Sir Dinshaw M. Petit



donated his plot and
bungalow at Parell for the Bai Sakarbai
Dinshaw Petit Hospital for Animals in
1884

Sir David Sassoon
built a synagogue, and established
schools for juvenile delinquents and for technical
education. His son, Albert, built the large Sassoon
dockyard and Colaba between 1872 and 1875. as also
the famous Devid Sassoon Library near the Bombay
University.

Goculdas Tejpal
donated a hospital,
Mulji Jetha

built the largest textile market in the city
Bomanji Wadia,
The Wadia Group is one of the oldest conglomerates of corporate India. It was founded by SirLovji Nusserwanjee Wadia in 1736. Lovji Wadia secured contracts with the British East India Company to build ships and docks in Bombay in 1736. This, and subsequent efforts, would result in Bombay becoming a strategic port for the British colonial undertakings in Asia. The one ship that the Wadias built and of most historic significance for Parsis is the HMS Minden. The Bombay Courier, June 23, 1810 wrote:
“On Tuesday last His Majesty’s Ship, the Minden built in the new docks (Bombay) by Jamshedji Bomanji Wadia was floated into the stream at high water, after the usual ceremony of breaking the bottle had been performed by the Honorable Governor Jonathan Duncan.

mukesh ambani

o------.....---mukesh ambani-........------

-0--........----Anil ambani-........-----0-
                                                                                                    Jun 19, 2019 -
The names of many mercantile magnates and pioneers of industry became synonymous with
the town's life. These included men such as
Sir Dinshaw Petit,
From his humble beginnings this industrious young man rose to be a captain of the industry in his homeland of India pioneering the introduction of several industries. His acts of philanthropy became a legend as he bankrolled the rescue mission aimed at saving at the remaining small community of Zarathushtrians in the birthplace of the faith, Iran.
Tatas have been at the forefront in the making of the Indian nation - not just by their monumental achievements as industrialists and entrepreneurs but also by their phenomenal philanthropic contributions in areas of medical research, higher education, aviation, culture, arts and human development. This article while highlighting the attributes of J. R. D. Tata, encapsulates the essence of a 'Century of Trust' built on the Tata tradition of Charity, Industry and Integrity.
A socially conscious and visionary lady who despite her family means to live a lavish life dedicated her life to the service of those less privileged than herself. She became the first Zarathushti to think of building affordable homes, offering security for migrant families from Gujarat in search of a better future in the large metropolitan city of Bombay.
A young dynamic Zarathushti lady defies the colonial rule imposed on her country of birth at great personal risk, and sets the stage for the eventual independence of India half a century later

Nusserwanji Petit,


Khatau
SETH KHATAU MAKANJI STARTED THE KHATAU GROUP IN 1874;PART OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY OF INDIA
Dharamsey Punjabhai,
James Greaves,
James Greaves & Company (JGC), an Indian firm that was established in 1858. JGC went into a partnership with George Cotton, an agent of the East India Company, to set up a venture called Greaves Cotton & Company. In 1927, Crompton & Company merged with F. A. Parkinson, pioneers in the field of large-scale industrial engineering to form a new company, Crompton Parkinson. Crompton Parkinson, UK, set up a factory in Worli, Bombay
George Cotton,

Morarji Goculdas,
Morarjee Goculdas was a textile magnate 1870
Morarjee on a 1977 stamp of India
Narottam Morarjee (1877–1929) was an eminent Indian businessperson with major interests in shipping and textiles.[1][2]
Narottam Morarjee was born on 2 April 1877 at Porbandar. His father Seth Morarjee Goculdas was a pioneering textile magnate.

Sir Ibrahim Rahimtoola,
SIR IBRAHIM RAHIMTOOLA
A committed reformer and eminent writer, Ibrahim Rahimtoola was an ardent champion of the Indianisation of various services. He held very progressive views in matters of social reform and strongly advocated female education and abolition of the pardah system. He was a member of the Bombay Legislative Council (1899-1912) and later its President (1923-26). He was a member of the Executive Council, Bombay (1918-23) and Leader of the Bombay Legislative Council (1921-23). He was also a member of the Imperial Legislative Council (1913-18). He was the President of the Central Legislative Assembly during 1931-33. A firm believer in self-government, he advocated constitutional means for gaining India's Independence.

Thackersey Mulji,
Mancherji Banaji,
Currimbhoy Ibrahim,
Sir (Fazalbhoy) Currimbhoy Ebrahim, 1st Baronet (21 October 1840–26 September 1924) was an Indian Muslim businessman. He wasknighted during the Prince and Princess of Wales's Indian tour of 1905[1] and created a baronet in 1910[2] and further granted lands to support that dignity by the Currimbhoy Ebrahim Baronetcy Act 1913[3] following the precedent set by the Cowasji Jehangir Baronetcy Act.
David Sassoon
and many others. These captains of
industry not only wielded considerable civic and political influence, but also donated
generously towards innumerable charities and public institutions in Bombay.


This photograph of the city of Pune was taken by an unknown photographer in the 1860s to from part of an album entitled 'Photographs of India and Overland Route'. Pune was the eighteenth-century capital of Raja Shivaji, the Maratha king who defied the Mughal emperor Aurangzeb. In 1802 Jaswant Rao Holkar defeated the combined armies of the Peshwa and Scindia. As a result of this defeat the Peshwa invited British assistance and Pune was occupied by troops under Wellesley in 1803. After the battle of Kirkee in November 1817 it was surrendered to the British who based the summer headquarters of the Government of Bombay here and established a large military cantonment.

[Malabar Hill, Bombay.]
View from Malabar Hill
[Love Grove, Bombay.]
View of Breach from Love Grove.
[Breach Causeway, Bombay.]
View of Breach Causeway
[View From Belmont.]
View From Belmont.
[View From Belmont.]
View From Belmont.
[View from Sion Fort.]
View from Sion Fort.
[View From the Island of Elephanta.]
View from Sion Fort.
[View From the Island of Elephanta.]
View from Island of Elephanta.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 |

View of the Breach Causeway at Bombay.

View of the Breach Causeway at Bombay.


THE GREAT BREACH

The only record which survives of large-scale engineering before the arrival of the Portuguese is that of the remnants of a massive stone causeway across the Flats on the island of Bombay. These Flats were the low-lying lands between Dongri and Malabar hills, seperated from the island of Worli by the Great Breach, through which the sea poured in at high tide.

PYDHONIE AND UMARKHADI

The Great Breach may have extended almost to Umarkhadi, the creek seperating Bombay from Mazagaon. Occasionally the two would be linked by a shallow creek at the site of the crowded present-day bazaar area of Pydhonie. Only the name, which means "foot wash", now gives a clue to the fact that it was once a creek, because this was probably the first piece of land to be reclaimed from the sea.
Quite as likely, Umarkhadi was also filled in soon after the arrival of the British and joined Mazagaon irretrievably to Bombay. The last story in which Mazagaon appears as a seperate island relates to its occupation by the Sidi of Janjira in 1690-1. He was repelled by a rag-tag navy of fishermen led by the amateur Parsi admiral Rustomji Dorabji.

THE HORNBY VELLARD

Early efforts at land reclamation concentrated on the small creeks crossing the northern Flats of Bombay island. Several of these were dammed or filled in during the eighteenth century. As a result, the areas north and east of Umarkhadi andMazagaon were slowly settled in this period. However, the next major reclamation was due to the closure of the Great Breach north of Cumballa Hill in 1784 by the building of a sea-wall called the Hornby Vellard. The wall allowed reclamation of the Flats and supplied about 400 acres of land for the extension of the crowded inner city. The precincts of Mahalaxmi,Kamathipura, Tardeo and parts of Bycullah were settled.


Arrival Of Indian & Australian Mails At Alexandria EgypT on the way to Bombay 185
3

ALEXANDRIA Arrival of Indian & Australian mails. Egypt 1853 Stock Photo -  Alamy















Australian mails. Egypt 1853 Stock ...
alamy.com(ORIGINALLY PART OF MY BLOG -NOW UNDER NEW NAME OF THIS NEW COMPANY!!!!! )


PIGEON WITH LETTER CONTAINER ON BACK

POOR MAN'S PALANQUIN


below-Post haste[email of last century]


image
India, Pigeon Post Collection, 1931-41.
POst men running with postal articles 1850's picture[ called dawk wallah by english men ;Scinde Dawk was a very old postal system of runners that served the Sindh, The term also refers to the first postage stamps in india the forerunners of the adhesive stamps used throughout India]
Darius extended the network of roads across the Persian empire, to enable both troops and information to move with startling speed. At the centre of the system is the royal road from Susa to Sardis, a distance of some 2000 miles (3200 km). At intervals of a day's ride there are posting stations, where new men and fresh horses will be available at any moment to carry a document on through the next day's journey.By this method a message can travel the full distance of the road in ten days, at a speed of about 200 miles a day.other methods of communications in the past were [1]'message whistling' of canary islands[2] 'tom tom' messages by drum beats,[3]fire signal by south american indians[4] smoke signals by north american indians




history of the british empire - History World

www.historyworld.net › wrldhis › plaintexthistories
England makes tentative first steps towards establishing a presence beyond the ocean in the same decade as Spain and Portugal, the 1490s. In 1497 Henry VII ...


coins and more: 267) PUNPEX 2016, held at Chandigarh from 06-09 February  2016: (Part 1) (a) Indian Dak Runner (b) PUNPEX 2016 Logo: Special Covers  released on 06.02.2016:
Indian Dak Runner ...
India postage 1930 - SHOWS THE 'Dak runner'

Pigeons with messages attached.



Pigeon Post during 1st world war


ICE HOUSE AND GREAT WESTERN HOTEL

late four from J M Gonsalves' 'Views at Bombay'. During the 1820s, institutions for currency production were constructed in various parts of India including Bombay, Benares and Calcutta. These imposing Doric structures can be seen to represent the feeling of growing political power of the English. The
Bombay Mint was constructed between 1821and 1829 on the site of the Fort rubbish dump. The architect was John Hawkins of the Bombay Engineers. The building on the right of the picture is the Town Hall.
icture of six 'Native Judges and Officers of the Court of the Recorder, at Bombay', at the beginning of F W Blagdon's book, 'A Brief History of Ancient and Modern India'. According to Blagdon, these drawings 'were taken from life in 1758' and are labelled respectively as holding the following positions. '1. Judge of the Hindoo Law, Antoba Crustnagee Pundit. 2. Interpreter, Rhowangee Sewagee. 3. Hindoo Officer, Lellather Chatta Bhutt. 4. Judge of the Mohomedan Law, Cajee Husson. 5. Officer to the Mooremen, Mahmoud Ackram of the Codjee order or priesthood of the cast of Moormens. 6. Haveldar, or summoning Officer, Mahmound Ismael'.


1838.


Engraving of the Grant Medical College showing part of Sir Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy's Hospital in Bombay by G. R. Sargent from his own drawing and published by him in London in 1844. The engraving was printed by M & N Hanhart. The Grant Medical College and the Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy Hospital were built in the 1840s and funded jointly by Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy and the East India Company. Jamsetjee Jeejeebhoy (1783-1859) was a Parsi merchant and eminent philanthropist. The Grant Medical College is shown in the foreground of this view. It was named after Sir Robert Grant, the Governor of Bombay between 1835 and 1838.


Coloured lithograph by Vincent Brooks of the inlet tower, with a portion of the principal dam, of the Vehar Reservoir of the Bombay Waterworks at Bombay in Maharashtra, dated c.1857.


The idea for the construction of a wet docks for the use of shipping in Bombay harbour was first suggested by M. Malet when member of Council in 1855. In 1866, Russell Aitken, Executive Engineer to the Municipality prepared the foundation of a Harbour and Dock Trust which could raise money for the construction of wet docks on the Elphinstone and Mody Bay reclamations as private companies had gone into a recession. In 1875, the first stone was laid in the hope that the new dock would create a prosperous revolution in the trade of Bombay. In April 1879, the Prince's Dock was thrown open by the Governor of Bombay, Sir Richard Temple. In 1884, it was decided to extend the dock and construction then began on the Victoria Dock.




Group of pupils of the Juggunath Shankarset Girls' School, Bombay

Photograph of a group of pupils from the Juggunath Shankarset Girls' School at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image of pupils posed on the verandah was probably shown at the Vienna Exhibition of that year. On the photograph, there is a letterpress caption, above the main caption, which reads "Student's Literary & Scientific Society, founded 1848. President Dr Bhau Daji." S.M. Edwardes wrote in The Gazetteer of Bombay City and Island (3 vols, Bombay (1909-10), "...The Students' Literary and Scientific Society, which supported nine vernacular free schools for girls, attended by 654 pupils, of whom 136 were Marathi-speaking Hindus, 120 Gujarati Hindus and 398 Parsis...The formation of this society was promoted by Professor Patton of the Elphinstone College in 1848. It was intended by the student and assistant teachers of the Elphinstone Institution to be a mutual improvement society and to aid the dissemination of knowledge by means of vernacular lectures and the publication of cheap periodicals in the vernacular languages..


Bombay Photo Images[ Mumbai]: Bombay Esplanade in 1870
Bombay Esplanade in 1870
oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com

This view of the Esplanade in Bombay was taken by an unknown photographer in the 1860s. Originally, Bombay was composed of seven islands separated by a marshy swamp. It’s deep natural harbour led the Portuguese settlers of the sixteenth century to call it Bom Bahia (the Good Bay). The British Crown acquired the islands in 1661when Catherine of Braganza married Charles II, as part of her marriage dowry. It was then presented to the East India Company in 1668. The second governor, Gerald Aungier, developed Bombay into a trading port and centre for commerce and inducements were offered to skilled workers and traders to move here. The Esplanade, now an area known as the Maidans, is set behind Marine Drive on the western side of Colaba Causeway. Before the land on which Marine Drive was built was reclaimed from the sea, the area formed the seaside esplanade behind Chowpatty Beach.


General view of The Esplanade, Bombay.

Photograph - Ceremony witnessing the handing of the British Crown from the East India Company to Queen Victoria

  • Ceremony witnessing the handing of the British Crown from the East India Company to Queen Victor



INDIANS CARRYING,ON A PALANQUIN- A WHITE WOMAN WITH A WHITE UMBRELLA IN SIMLA MALL(MAIN STREET) 19 TH CENTURY PHOTO.[INDIANS WERE NOT ALLOWED IN THE MALL AREA BY BRITISH RULERS IN THE BEGINNING BUT LATER ON ALLOWED]



ANTIQUE POST CARD-SCHOOL BOYS AND TEACHER-BOMBAY.THE SCHOOL BOYS ARE USING PALM LEAF BOOKS -IN THEIR HANDS,(PROBABLY VEDA SCHOOL)

{Palm leaves were first cut from the trees before they could dry up and become brittle. These were then boiled in water to the required temperature in order to render them soft. The softened leaves were then dried in the shade or mild sunshine. The desired portion was taken from mid-leaf, pressed and then polished. These were then cut into the required size and made into rolls of paper.Tālapatras or palm leaves of slightly yellow hew, eight angulas (inches) long, which were more brittle and hence cheaper, were given to students for copy work. The leaves of shritāla were a slight red in color and were 24 to 32 angulas in length. These were quite thin, soft and malleable. Such leaves were supplied to poets, scholars and writers.
There were professional palm-leaf paper-makers (ôleya kāyakadavaru) 2, who prepared ready-to-write ôles or palm-leaves, and supplied them to mathas , basadis, temple schools and private individuals. These were sold in rolls ( kāttu) in village shanties as well3. Specially prepared preservative oil was applied to palm-leaf rolls before tying them into a book. Turmeric was often used to make the rolls colorful. Holes were made in the margins of these leaves, through which silken thread was passed and the leaves were carefully tied, and finally the book was ready

Class with mistress in a mofussil or up-country girls' school, Bombay

Class with mistress in a mofussil or up-country girls' school, Bombay

Group of Parsee pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay --

Group of Parsee pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay




























Photograph of pupils in a class of the Elphinstone High School at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image of pupils gathered around a table conducting an experiment, possibly in physics, was shown at the Vienna Exhibition of the same year. The school shown here is named after Mountstuart Elphinstone who helped to establish the educational structure of the Bombay area. The Imperial Gazetteer of India states, "There are three classes of secondary schools - the vernacular and English middle schools, and the high schools...The English secondary school stage is divided into middle and high school sections, which really form portions of the same course...the English school education should ordinarily be completed by the time the pupil attained the age of sixteen...In English secondary schools the main course has hitherto led up to the matriculation or entrance examination of one or other of the Universities. There are other courses of a more practical character leading up to different examinations...A purely literary education has been more popular among both parents and students, as being in itself more attractive to them and as affording a better opening for remunerative employment. The matriculation has generally been accepted as a qualifying test by Government and private employers as well as by the Universities, and has been regarded as the common goal of the school career."

Group of Maratha(?) pupils and masters in class of the Elphinstone High School, Bombay

A girls' school operating in Jagannath Shankar Seth's residential complex

 




Jagannath Shankar Shet (10 October 1800 – 31 July 1865), was a notable Indian Philanthropist and a revolutionary Educationalist. He was born in 1800 in the wealthy Murkute family of Goldsmiths of the Daivadnya Caste in Mumbai (Bombay). He was one of the founders of Elphinstone College, and Indian Railway Association that became part of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway. He was the first Indian member to be nominated to the Legislative Council of Bombay under the XXTY 26 Act of 1861, a member of the Bombay Board of Education, and also the first Indian member of the famous Asiatic Society of Bombay.


Group of pupils of the Bhagwandas Purshottum Girls' School, Bombay

Photograph of a group of pupils from the Bhagwandas Purshottum Girls' School at Bombay in Maharashtra from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in c. 1873. This image of pupils posed on the verandah was probably shown at the Vienna Exhibition of that year. On the photograph, there is a letterpress caption, above the main caption, which reads "Student's Literary & Scientific Society, founded 1848. President Dr Bhau Daji." S.M. Edwardes wrote in The Gazetteer of Bombay City and Island (3 vols, Bombay (1909-10), "...The Students' Literary and Scientific Society, which supported nine vernacular free schools for girls, attended by 654 pupils, of whom 136 were Marathi-speaking Hindus, 120 Gujarati Hindus and 398 Parsis...The formation of this society was promoted by Professor Patton of the Elphinstone College in 1848. It was intended by the student and assistant teachers of the Elphinstone Institution to be a mutual improvement society and to aid the dissemination of knowledge by means of vernacular lectures and the publication of cheap periodicals in the vernacular languages..."

Group of mistress and pupils of the Government Normal School, Bombay19TH CENTURY

Group of mistress and pupils of the Government Normal School, Bombay









Coloured lithograph of the Government House at Parel in Bombay by Day & Son after Sir Harry Francis Colville Darrell (1814-1853) from his 'China, India and the Cape' published in London in 1852. Parel, originally an island, is located in the northern part of Bombay. The building shown in this view was built by the Jesuits[ as a church] under Portuguese rule in the 16th and 17th centuries.Later It was used as a country retreat for the English Governor of Bombay from 1719. In 1829, the building officially became the Government House. However, in the 1880s the Government House was relocated to Malabar Point.

THE ICE HOUSE':-

BELOW:-
BOMBAY 1850Photograph
from 'Views in the island of Bombay' by Charles Scott,1850s. This is a view looking north along Apollo Street from the Apollo Gate towards the dockyards entrance on the right.
The Scotch Church
stands in the left foreground, with Hornby House beyond. The classic Georgian style Saint Andrew's or Scotch Kirk was completed in 1819.
Hornby House,
which initially began as a residence to the Governor Hornby, served as the Law Court until the late 1870s when it became the Great Western Hotel.
Between this building and the church, stands the domed
Ice-House,
erected by subscription in 1843 for the consignments of ice which were imported regularly and sold to the public. When ice began to be manufactured in Bombay the Ice-House lost its purpose and was used as a godown until it was demolished years later.

{ SHOWS HORSE CARRIAGES AND BULLOCK CART CARRIAGES PARKED NEXT TO COURT HOUSE;AND A MAN WAITING FOR CUSTOMERS WITH HIS PALANQUIN NEAR CHURCH STEPS;FORT BOMBAY.
'


-SEEN AS A WHITE ROUND HOUSE AND A WHITE ROUND ROOF}
.The ice-house was a double-shelled structure,twenty-five feet square on its outside dimension, nineteen feet square on the interior, and sixteen feet high. It held about 150 tons of ice. ICE WAS HARVESTED FROM PLACES NEAR TO THE NORTH POLE AND FROZEN LAKES.,BROUGHT BY SHIP AND KEPT FOR USE. [ELECTRICITY /REFRIGERATION Were NOT YET DISCOVERED].
Once inside, the blocks were piled together as closely as possible to prevent all unnecessary melting. The workmen in the ice-houses pried loose the stored ice by means of chisels.Wenham Lake ice enjoyed its greatest popularity in England between the year 1844 and the early years of the 185o's. It was in demand everywhere, and it grew into such vogue that London hotels put up signs informing their customers that Wenham Lake ice was served there.Main customers were the local coffee-house owners who bought the ice for the manufacture of their ice-creams.
READ ALSO how ice was brought to Bombay from America by ship:- :-http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/02/how-ice-came-to-india-1833.html

STORY OF ICE AND ICECREAMS IN BOMBAY

BOMBAY:-ICE CAME TO BOMBAY VIA SHIP FROM U.S.A IN 1833
In 1833, fellow Boston-based merchant Samuel Austin proposed a partnership for selling ice to India, then some 16,000 miles and four months away from Massachusetts. On May 12, 1833 the brig Tuscany sailed from Boston for Calcutta, its hold filled with 180 tons of ice cut during the winter. When it approached the Ganges in September 1833, many believed the delivery was an elaborate joke, but the ship still had 100 tons of ice upon arrival. Over the next 20 years, Calcutta would become Tudor's most lucrative destination, yielding an estimated $220,000 in profits.

large crowd of natives gathered at the wharf to witness the unloading of these
"crystal blocks of Yankee coldness."
One of the Indians braved to touch a piece of the ice, and, believing that he had burned himself, wrapped his hand in his robe and rushed away followed by a number of the alarmed onlookers. At another time, a native was supposed to have asked Captain Codman,
"How this ice make grow in your country? Him grow on tree? Him grow on shrub - how he make grow?"
Bombay's first ice house(ice storage house where ice unloaded from ship was stored) next to the harbour ;seen in the photo as a rounded white dome house;next to the church--1860's photo






"From the insides of this boat they were taking out great pieces of white stuff, which, in a little while, turned to water. Much split off, and fell about on the shore, and the rest they swiftly put into a house with thick walls. But a boatman, who laughed, took a piece no larger than a small dog, and threw it to me. I - of all people - swallowed without reflection, and that piece I swallowed as is our custom. Immediately I was afflicted with an excessive cold which, beginning in my crop, ran down to the extreme end of my toes, and deprived me even of speech, while the boatmen laughed at me. Never have I felt such cold. I danced in my grief and amazement till I could recover my breath, and then I danced and cried out against the falseness of this world; and the boatmen derided me till they fell down. The chief wonder of the matter, setting aside the marvellous coldness, was that there was nothing at all in my crop when I had finished my lamentings
VINTAGE ICE CRUSHER

Image result for wooden ice cream freezer
Product
Hand Operated Ice Cream Freezer, Ice ...
indiamart.com



Developed for home use in 1848, the traditional crank ice-cream freezer employs a metal dasher inserted into a metal cylinder full of ice-cream base, which is placed in a bucket filled with a rock-saltand ice mixture (brine). The hand or motor-cranked dashers turn around in the ice-cream mixture as it freezes, preventing icecrystals from forming and ensuring a smooth, creamy final product.




HORSE PULLED ICE AND ICE CREAM CARTS c: 19th century




Falooda

Kulfi: [India's answer to Gelato]

GolaA big ball of ice shavings twinkles like a lump of South African diamonds, kala khatta juice dripping off its sides. Fix it to your lips and slurp away in bliss.
Bhisti filling his Pukhal, Surat
This image shows a water carrier pouring water from a leather bucket into the leather container slung over the back of a bullock;A Bheestie or Pukkalli [using a bullock - as in this image] is a domestic servant;Bheesties deliver as many potsful or skinsful as may be needed during the day, and are paid in proportion. They also serve in the regular army;In cavalry regiments a Pukkal Bheestie...is also on the establishment of every troop, in the proportion of one to twenty-five or thirty horses;[Watson and Kaye's 'The People of India', published in eight volumes from 1868 to1875]
Many of the best houses in the Bazaar had deep wells of fairly
good water within their tenements,but an abundant supply was available for those who had it not from the wells which had been dug outside the walls on the Esplanade,[NEWS OF THE GARRISON OF BOMBAY, 1845. as reported in 1887]

READ ALSO:- the first dentist inside bombay fort etc news:-http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2009/02/bombay-firsts-19-th-century-first.html


 OUT SIDE BOMBAY FORT-IN FRONT OF OLD CHURCH GATE OF THE FORT
 WITH ST .THOMAS CHURCH IN THE BACK GROUND

PHOTO BELOW SHOWS:-
THE ORIGINAL CHURCH GATE OF BOMBAY FORT;
NAMED CHURCH GATE ; BECAUSE THE GATE WAS NEAR ST.THOMAS CHURCH WHICH CAN BE SEEN IN THE BACK. LATER CHURCH GATE RAILWAY STATION GOT THIS SAME NAME ;AS IT WAS BUILT NEAR THIS FORT GATE.THE FORT WAS BUILT AGAINST ENEMIES;SUCH AS PORTUGUESE AND SIDDI SHIPS
THE GATE HAD A BRIDGE BUILT, OVER A MOAT, FILLED WITH WATER ;TO PREVENT ENEMY SOLDIERS;CAN BE SEEN IN THIS PHOTO.THIS FORT AND GATE WERE DEMOLISHED AND Flora Fountain was positioned at the same spot where the Church gate stood before its demolition.


OLD CHURCH GATE STATION 1940

below:- BOMBAY TIMES OFFICE SEEN IN FOREGROUND[second building from the corner]


A brief history of The Times

1838: The first edition appears on November 3, 1838, known as The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce. The newspaper was published twice a week under editor J.E. Brennan. It is basically a city paper reflecting the interest of Bombay's business community.[12]
1846-1857: The newspaper changes hands and George Buist, LL.D, F.R.S., becomes the editor of the Times from 1840-57.[13]
1850: Shareholders decide to increase the share capital and the paper is converted into a daily.[14]
1859: Bombay Standard and Chronicle of Western India merges into The Bombay Times and Journal of Commerce to form Bombay Times & Standard[15]
1861: Editor Robert Knight amalgamates The Bombay Times & Standard and Bombay Telegraph & Courier to form The Times of India and gives it a national character.[12]
1880: The Times of India Weekly Edition is launched name later changed to The Times of India Illustrated Weekly and finally to The Illustrated Weekly of India in 1923.[16]

Church Gate Street, Bombay.Photographer: Unknown Medium: Photographic print Date: 1860


CHURCH GATE =THE GATE OF THE BOMBAY FORT ; NEAR TO ST THOMAS CATHEDRAL CHURCH,SEEN AT FAR END [THE FORT HAD MANY SIMILAR GATES ;The fort walls had three main gates. One was the Apollo Gate, near the present day location of the St. Andrew's Church. The most well-known was Church Gate, named after St. Thomas', standing almost exactly on the spot that the Flora Fountain now occupies. The third was the Bazaar Gate, right opposite the present dome of the General Post Office, which lends its name to the area even now, long after the gate itself has disappeared.]

This view of Churchgate Street, now known as Vir Nariman Road, in the Fort area of Bombay was taken in the 1860s to form part of an album entitled 'Photographs of India and Overland Route'. Churchgate Street runs from Horniman Circle at the east end to what was originally named Marine Drive at the edge of the Back Bay. Churchgate Station, the old General Post Office (now the Telegraph Office) and the Cathedral Church of St Thomas, the oldest still-functioning structure in the city, are all located along its length. However, Churchgate Station and the Post Office were later additions to the street and would not have been in existence at the time of this photograph.
In 1772 an order was promulgated to segregate Indian and English houses, both within and outside the Fort. A more important development came five years later, in 1777, when the first newspaper in Bombay was published


also read ABOUT HARVESTING OF ICE FROM FROZEN LAKES AND FIELDS FOR EXPORT TO FAR OFF PLACES INCLUDING INDIA 1850'S>> :-http://www.iceharvestingusa.com/Frederic%20Tudor%20Ice%20King.html
http://www.iceharvestingusa.com/crystalblocks1.html

when the natives on Bombay first saw the ice being unloaded from ice barges:-
"From the insides of this boat they were taking out great pieces of white stuff, which, in a little while, turned to water. Much split off, and fell about on the shore, and the rest they swiftly put into a house with thick walls. But a boatman, who laughed, took a piece no larger than a small dog, and threw it to me. I - of all people - swallowed without reflection, and that piece I swallowed as is our custom. Immediately I was afflicted with an excessive cold which, beginning in my crop, ran down to the extreme end of my toes, and deprived me even of speech, while the boatmen laughed at me. Never have I felt such cold. I danced in my grief and amazement till I could recover my breath, and then I danced and cried out against the falseness of this world; and the boatmen derided me till they fell down. The chief wonder of the matter, setting aside the marvelous coldness, was that there was nothing at all in my crop when I had finished my lamenting s."

THE LONG LONG (HOT ) DAY IN AN ENGLISH MAN'S LIFE IN INDIA

BOMBAY 1880'S BEFORE DISCOVERY OF AUTO MOBILES-(CARS) SHOWS HORSE (PULLED)TRAMS AND HORSE CARRIAGES AT FLORA FOUNTAIN.. IT SEEMS THE ROADS ARE SPRINKLED WITH WATER ,ON THE LEFT SIDE ,TO PREVENT DUST CLOUDS FROM ROAD;USING BULLOCK CARTS AS SEEN IN PHOTO
HORSE DRAWN TRAMS;HORSE CARRIAGES,BULLOCK CARTS ALSO SEEN
Bhendy Bazaar Road, Bombay.

Bhendi Bazaar was a bustling commercial area of the city,


THE TAJ MAHAL PALACE HOTEL ENTRANCE.



foot pedal fan before electricity

A glimpse of the city circa 1890,Bombay Kalba Devie Road

Bombay kalbadevie road

Bombay,[BULLOCK CART FOR PASSENGERS] a photo by Francis Frith, c.1870'
BOMBAY STREET SCENE 1900'S




http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2010_07_06_archive.html

-BOMBAY-FLORA FOUNTAIN;SHOWING HORSE CARRIAGE

collotype by Clifton & Co., c.1900; * overview of the

TAXI

TOWN HALL 1850'S PHOTO

PHOTO OF V.T.(VICTORIA TERMINUS RAILWAY STATION) NOW NAMED C.S.T (CHATRAPATI SHIVAJI TERMINUS)STATION;NO CARS -ONLY HORSE POWERED TRAMS;CARRIAGES;BULLOCK CARTS.C: 1880









1853


On April 16th, at 3:35pm, the first train in India leaves Bombay for Thane

BELOW PAINTING DOESNOT BELONG TO GETTY IMAGES -IT WAS PAINTED IN INDIA 19 TH CENTURY 

IT SHOWS GOVERNOR OF BOMBAY RIDING DOWN FROM THE FORESTS OF MALABAR HILL AFTER HUNTING WILD ANIMALS
 -RIDING DOWN WALKESWAR ROAD TOWARDS CHOWPATTY BEACH BOMBAY
Old vintage photo of Walkeshwar road, Mumbai, maharashtra, India : Stock Photo
Image result for STEAM BUSES CAN BE SEEN IN NEHRU SCIENCE MUSEUM MUMBAI



 STEAM BUSES CAN BE SEEN IN NEHRU SCIENCE MUSEUM MUMBAI

http://www.antiqueprints-maps.com/mas_assets/full2/M1321885/M1321885405.jpg

THE TILE ROOFED HOUSE ABOVE WAS ANDHERI STATION 1870'S
......................................................................................
BELOW :- PHOTO OF BANDRA -1850'S FOX HUNT

[flora+fountain.jpg]


photo

fashions;drinks;cigars,road rules etc of life in Bombay fort:--O

HORSE CARRIAGES WAITING IN FRONT OF TAJ MAHAL HOTEL BOMBAY
1300 × 920 
ALAMY STAMPS ANY OLD PHOTO AS THEIR'S?!!😈
































ADELPHI HOTEL BOMBAY















BELOW PHOTO 1880'S-METRO THEATER AREA? CARS YET TO BE BORN!
Victoria-Terminus-Railway-Station and Horse driven Trams & Cart on road 1900

BELOW BOMBAY VICTORIA MEMORIAL RAILWAY STATION (NOW C.S.T. STATION)-B.C. [MEANS BEFORE CARS-1890'S ]





BELOW:-"KALA GHODA"STATUE;SEEN STANDING IN FRONT OF SASSOON LIBRARY AND Elphinstone College
{Kala Ghoda (Marathi: काळा घोडा) is a precinct or district in South Mumbai, India.
The name means Black Horse, a reference to a black stone statue of King Edward VII (as the then Prince of Wales) mounted on a horse it was actually build by the famous Jewish businessman and the greatest person who contributed a lot to the city of mumbai Sir David Sassoon who owned Most of the property of this area later also a Library and a lane named after him . Although this statue was removed in 1965 to storehouses of the Bhau Daji Lad Museum (formerly the Victoria & Albert Museum (Mumbai)) in Byculla, Central Mumbai, the name persists. The statue is now in the Jijamata Udyan in Byculla.}


History of Kala Ghoda – Statue Old & New | MeMumbai
History of Kala Ghoda – Statue Old ...
memumbai.com

"The Plague in Bombay: House to House Visitation,BY DOCTOR" from the Illustrated London News, 1898 (with modern hand coloring)



 
kala Ghoda statue

BELOW -STANDING IN MIDDLE OF ROAD IS THE BOMBAY POLICE MAN


Pydownie (Mohammed Ali Road) | Old Bombay | Mounted Photo Print
Product






Pydownie (Mohammed Ali Road) | Old ...
bombay100yearsago.com · In stock


PYDOWNIE STREET/MOHAMMED ALI ROAD. Most popular for all-night eating during the fasting month of Ramadan, the congested

1902 CAR IN BOMBAY:-[cars were originally called as 'horseless carriages']

800 × 633Sir (Rustomjee Cowasjee Cursetjee) Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, 5th Bt; Sir Charles William Cayzer, 1st Bt; Miss Cayzer; Miss Jejeebhoy; Sir Jamsetjee Manockjee Cursetjee Jejeebhoy, 4th Bt-1902

Miss Cayzer; Sir Jamsetjee Manockjee Cursetjee Jejeebhoy, 4th Bt; Miss Jejeebhoy; Sir (Rustomjee Cowasjee Cursetjee) Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, 5th Bt


 

 
Image result for CARS CAME TO INDIA IN 1898.THIS CAR NUMBER PLATE-REG:NO: 36-[-MAY
CARS CAME TO INDIA IN 1898.THIS CAR NUMBER PLATE-REG:NO: 36-[-MAY BE THE 36TH CAR IN INDIA ]

History -- Early years[The first speed limits in the United Kingdom were set by a series of restrictive Locomotive Acts (in 1861,The 1865 (the 'red flag act') reduced the speed limit to 4 mph (6 km/h) in the country and 2 mph (3 km/h) in towns and required a man with a red flag or lantern to walk 60 yards (50 m) ahead of each vehicle, and warn horse riders and horse drawn traffic of the approach of a self-propelled machine;1904Under the Motor Car Act every road going vehicle had to be registered; cars and bikes had to carry front and rear registration plates


The London to Brighton Veteran Car Run 2010








SARDAR MIR ALI BAHDUR THE FIRST DETECTIVE OF POLICE OF BOMBAY IN 19TH CETURY


'GATE WAY OF INDIA' BUILT HERE LATER; ALSO (PHOTO BELOW)
Harbor Of Bombay

The Apollo Bunder, Bombay
The Apollo Bunder, Bombay
paperjewels.org
Bombay Photo Images[ Mumbai]: History-Gate way of India,1800-now
History-Gate way of India,1800-now
oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com

Apollo Bunder


http://oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com/2011/02/old-postcards-of-bombay-mumbai.html
Bombay Photo Images[ Mumbai]: History-Gate way of India,1800-now











History-Gate way of India,1800-now
oldphotosbombay.blogspot.com
The Gateway of India, Mumbai, by George Wittet (1878-1926)













The Gateway of India, Mumbai, by George ...
victorianweb.org



The structure was erected to commemorate the landing of their Majesties
King George V and Queen Mary at Apollo Bunder, when they visited India in 1911. Built in Indo-Saracenic style, the foundation stone for the Gateway of India was laid on 31 March 1911. The final design of George Wittet was sanctioned in 1914 and the construction of the monument was completed in 1924. The Gateway was later the ceremonial entrance to India for Viceroys and the new Governors of Bombay.[10] It served to allow entry and access to India


Dedication ceremony of the gateway, 1924.

File:Vintage Postcard of Gateway of India.jpg

GATEWAY OF INDIA 1940'S



Terrorists Downgrade Gateway Focus!
Terrorists Downgrade Gateway Focus!
daijiworld.com
OFFICER SITS ON HAND PULLED RICKSHAW;

Rickshaw pullers playing cards 19 th century







A 1905 Humber car , photographed in Bombay-(ONE OF THE FIRST CARS IN BOMBAY)








Image result for THE TAXI DRIVER SAT IN THE OPEN FRONT 1890
 FIRST FLEET OF TAXI CARS  1910;THE PASSENGER SAT IN THE COVERED CABIN WHILE THE TAXI DRIVER SAT IN THE OPEN FRONT ;JUST SAME ARRANGEMENT AS A HORSE CARRIAGE




TAXIS IN NEW YORK 1914-SIMILAR 20 CARS WERE IMPORTED FOR USE AS TAXI IN INDIA ;MAINLY FOR CALCUTTA,BOMBAY




NEW CAR SHOW ROOM 1910


DE DION BUTON CAR-1912-cars mostly handle start;self starting cars were made from 1912 onwards


THE MAN STARTING HIS CAR ; (BY CRANKING THE STARTING HANDLE WAS THE ONLY WAY ,BEFORE SELF STARTER WAS DISCOVERED)
http://youtu.be/DArvPMlxHeQ
CARS 1920 CALCUTTA

Image result for MAHATMA GANDHI ;NEAR CAR 1930'S

MAHATMA GANDHI ;NEAR CAR 1930'S









below :- flora fountain 1920's




cars on the road in india- THERE WAS NO 'A' OR 'B' OR 'C' JUST THE NUMBER FOR THE CAR--SEE BELOW THE CAR REGISTRATION NO: JUST '26903'.THIS WAS WHEN NUMBER OF CARS WERE VERY FEW-PHOTO OF CALCUTTA 1930'S
Early registration numbers in India-calcutta-street-front-grand-hotel-date-unknown.jpg
Early registration numbers in India-scan0005.jpg

Early registration numbers in India-ind-1902-3915-calcuttarak-photo-c1931-.jpg




ENGLISH SOLDIER'S MESS IN COLONIAL INDIA (BEFORE ELECTRICLIGHT CAME),WITH GAS LIGHT AND OVERHEAD HAND OPERATED PUNKAH(FAN)



Patent drawing for a Fan Moved by Mechanism, 27 November 1830.A PUNKAH[HAND PULLED FAN] PULLER IS EMPLOYED TO PULL THE PUNKAH CORD ,FROM OUT SIDE THE WINDOW .THE MECHANISM IS SIMPLE:- HE PULLS THE CORD ENOUGH TO MAKE THE MADE OF, MAT FAN ;ALL THE WAY TO THE WINDOW AND THEN HE LET GO THE CORD TILL THE FAN GOES BACK AUTOMATICALLY TO THE ORIGINAL POSITION.IT IS A PRETTY BORING JOB TO PULL CORD AND LET GO REPEATEDLY FOR HOURS AT A TIME . COMPARE SUCH REPETITIVE BORING WORK;
EQUAL TO THE SLAVE OAR PULLERS OF ANCIENT ROMAN SHIP ;WHO HAD TO ROW AND ROW FOR HOURS
Christ Church interior [Trivandrum]


Image result for THE PUNKAH BOY-PULLING THE PUNKAH-FAN
 
 
 
 
 
Punkah wallahs in action, British India ...

THE PUNKAH BOY-PULLING THE PUNKAH-FAN

 



Bombay Electric Supply & Tramways Company Limited was a sole provider of electric supply, electric tram service and buses in the Mumbaicity from 1905 to till 1947 when it was municipalised to form the Bombay Electric Supply and Transport Undertaking. [BELOW PHOTO OF B.E.S.T.BUS 1920'S;AND B.E.S.T.'S SINGLE DECKER AND DOUBLE DECKER TRAMS,]


Mumbai first electric tram car began operations in 1907.